Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

Trump: Fake News And Unnamed Sources

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Trump Administration, Trukey Crackdown, French Presidential Race (part 1)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Trump Administration, Trukey Crackdown, French Presidential Race (part 2)

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Aux Champs-Elysées: The story behind France's most famous avenue

Read more

#TECH 24

Foosball gets its own social network

Read more

YOU ARE HERE

Inlays and veneers: The art of French cabinetmaking

Read more

PEOPLE & PROFIT

How should companies respond to a Trump Twitter attack?

Read more

#THE 51%

Trump abortion funding ban: Europe tries to fill the breach

Read more

REPORTERS

Video: India’s Kuki people, possible descendants of one of Israel's lost tribes

Read more

Liver transplant changed Australian girl's blood group

Latest update : 2008-01-24

A 15-year-old Australian girl had her blood group and immune system switched to her donor's after she received his liver. This is an unprecedent case in medical history.

An Australian girl spontaneously switched blood groups and adopted her donor's immune system following a liver transplant in the first known case of its type, doctors treating her said Thursday.

Demi-Lee Brennan was aged nine and seriously ill with liver failure when she received the transplant, doctors at a top Sydney children's hospital told AFP.

Nine months later it was discovered that she had changed blood types and her immune system had switched over to that of the donor after stem cells from the new liver migrated to her bone marrow.

She is now a healthy 15-year-old, Michael Stormon, a hepatologist treating her, told AFP. Stormon said he had given several presentations on the case around the world and had heard of none like it.

"It is extremely unusual -- in fact we don't know of any other instance in which this happened," Stormon told AFP from the Children's Hospital.

"In effect she had had a bone marrow transplant. The majority of her immune system had also switched over to that of the donor."

An article on the case was published in Thursday's edition of the leading US medical journal The New England Journal of Medicine.

Doctors who treated Brennan say she is now only under treatment as an outpatient and are interested to know if the case could have other applications in transplant surgery, where rejection of donor organs by the recipient's immune system is a major hurdle.

Stormon said it appeared that Brennan may have been fortunate because a "sequence of serendipitous events", including a post-transplantation infection, may have given the stem cells from her donor's liver the chance to proliferate.

The task now was to establish whether the same sort of outcome could be replicated in other transplant patients, he said.

Date created : 2008-01-24

COMMENT(S)