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Hollywood writers vote to end strike

Latest update : 2008-02-13

Hollywood screenwriters voted to end their three-month long strike here Tuesday, union officials said, bringing to a close the US entertainment industry's most damaging dispute for 20 years. (Report: G. Fenwick)

Hollywood screenwriters voted to end their three-month long strike here Tuesday, union officials said, bringing to a close the US entertainment industry's most damaging dispute for 20 years.
  
Writers Guild of America (WGA) West leader Patric Verrone said members had voted overwhelmingly to end the strike, with 92.5 percent in favor following ballots conducted in Los Angeles and New York.
  
The decision to end the strike had been seen as a formality after WGA members voiced widespread support for a new contract presented to them by union leaders at the weekend.
  
Writers downed tools on November 5, a move that sent shockwaves through the industry, forcing the postponement or cancellation of several television shows and movies, and causing hundreds of millions of dollars in losses.
  
Previous contract talks between the WGA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP) collapsed the issue of payment for content broadcast free or bought over the Internet.
  
However, a breakthrough in negotiations saw the WGA reach a tentative agreement with producers, and a proposed new deal received enthusiastic backing after it was presented to writers on Saturday.
  
The writers' strike has been one of the longest and most damaging in the entertainment industry's history, with losses estimated by some officials at around 2 billion dollars.
  
It has also severely disrupted Hollywood's annual awards season, leading to the cancellation of the Golden Globes awards after actors vowed to boycott the event, and casting a shadow over preparations for the February 24 Oscars.

Date created : 2008-02-13

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