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France probes Liechtenstein tax evasion

Latest update : 2008-02-27

French tax authorities are investigating hundreds of people possibly involved in tax dodging through bank accounts in Liechtenstein, joining their British, German and Dutch counterparts in the crackdown.

French tax authorities are looking into information on possible tax dodgers with bank accounts in Liechtenstein, the Budget Ministry said on Tuesday, as Paris joined a European effort to crack down on tax evasion.
 

A day after Britain and the Netherlands allied themselves with Germany in seeking information on those with secret bank accounts in the landlocked tax haven, France said it had launched investigations into information it had received.
 

"The tax authorities have received information concerning people who might hold bank accounts open to being used for tax evasion in Liechtenstein. They are currently examining this information," the Budget Ministry said in a statement.
 

Germany paid for information that led to a probe into large-scale tax evasion linked to Liechtenstein which has forced out the head of Deutsche Post.
 

Budget Minister Eric Woerth said France had received the list of hundreds of names from British tax authorities and Paris had not paid for the information.
 

"We have a list of a few hundred names. We have had it since the start of the year. We are having it verified by experts. We are checking its accuracy," he told Public Senat television.
 

The list of French people linked to capital flows through Liechtenstein was not as big as the German one because there was less of an "attraction" to Liechtenstein for French people, Woerth said.
 

"We received it from the English authorities because there is a great deal of collaboration between European countries' tax offices and we must go further in that cooperation," he said.
 

"We paid no informant. It's not our style," Woerth added.

Date created : 2008-02-26

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