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Left wins first round of local elections

Latest update : 2008-03-10

According to a CSA-Dexia exit poll, Socialist and Green parties won 47.5% of the votes and the Right 40% in the French local elections.(Report: C.Moore)

President Nicolas Sarkozy's camp suffered setbacks in several major cities in round one of French local elections Sunday, dealing a new blow to the right-winger as he battles a collapse in popularity.
  
Exit polls showed the opposition Socialists well-placed to score big gains over Sarkozy's Union for a Popular Movement (UMP), in next Sunday's decisive second round of a vote cast as a referendum on his presidency.
  
The Socialists retained a firm grip on the capital Paris and cemented their hold on France's third city Lyon -- clinching victory in round one -- as well as on the northern capital Lille.
  
Paris mayor Bertrand Delanoe, a rising star of the left and one of France's most popular politicians, received a resounding thumbs-up for his pro-environment urban policies, with an estimated 42 percent of first round votes, against 27.7 for his right-wing rival Francoise de Panafieu.
  
Nationwide, the Socialists took some 47.5 percent of the vote, well ahead of the UMP and its allies on 40 percent, according to a CSA survey. Turnout was high, estimated at between 68 and 70.5 percent.
  
Socialist leader Francois Hollande said voters had sent "a warning to the president of the republic and the government on the policies conducted over the past nine months."
  
Fellow Socialist Segolene Royal, who had urged voters to "punish" Sarkozy's government, called on them to keep up the pressure in round two.
  
In Sarkozy's camp, Prime Minister Francois Fillon accused the left-wing opposition of "mixing up local and national issues" during the campaign -- but UMP chief Patrick Devedjian admitted on television the results were "not good."
  
Right-wing former prime minister Alain Juppe held on to the southwestern wine capital Bordeaux, winning reelection in the first round.
  
But the Socialists appeared well-placed to seize the eastern capital Strasbourg -- one of three key trophies up for grabs along with the second city Marseille on the Mediterranean and southwestern Toulouse.
  
Both southern cities were headed for a close-fought second round between the right-wing incumbents and left-wing challengers.
  
Exit polls also showed the left dethroning the UMP in the northwestern cities of Rouen and Caen and the southern city of Rodez.
  
The symbolic loss of one or more major city would further hurt Sarkozy's reputation and undermine his ability to plough ahead with wide-ranging reforms.
  
Triumphantly elected last May on a pledge to overhaul France's economy and tackle the rising cost of living, Sarkozy's approval rating has plummeted from 67 percent last July to around one third of the electorate.
  
The president's divorce from his second wife Cecilia, followed by a jet-setting romance and swift marriage to supermodel and singer Carla Bruni, gave many voters the impression he was neglecting their concerns.
  
The Socialists accuse Sarkozy of hobnobbing with the rich and famous while drawing up an austerity plan for ordinary folk.
  
Despite a fall in unemployment to 7.5 percent, its lowest level in more than two decades, French consumer confidence is stuck at a 21-year low.
  
Forty-four million French voters were called to choose the mayors and local councillors of 37,000 towns and villages as well as filling half of all local canton, or district, seats on the country's 100 departmental councils.
  
Sarkozy's UMP currently controls 55 percent of all towns of more than 30,000 inhabitants, after winning 23 from the left in 2001.
  
The vote has only a minor effect on national politics: of the 20 government members standing for local office, eight were comfortably elected in round one, with only Education Minister Xavier Darcos facing a tricky challenge.
  
The president's 21-year-old son Jean is also expected to win a cantonal seat in Neuilly, the wealthy Paris suburb that catapulted his father to political prominence some 30 years ago.

Date created : 2008-03-09

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