Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

No strategy and a beige suit

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 29 August 2014 (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 29 August 2014

Read more

ENCORE!

Alain Choquette: A Hilarious Magician in Paris

Read more

FOCUS

France welcomes Iraqi Christian refugees

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Emmanuel Macron: A new economy minister with a pro-business agenda

Read more

THE OBSERVERS

More of this year's best Observers stories

Read more

#TECH 24

Changing the world, one video game at a time

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Socialist Party summer conference kicks off in explosive atmosphere

Read more

  • Exclusive: Fabius warns of further sanctions against Russia

    Read more

  • Experimental Ebola drug ‘ZMapp’ heals all monkeys in study

    Read more

  • IMF stands behind Lagarde amid French corruption probe

    Read more

  • Ukraine to relaunch NATO membership bid

    Read more

  • Suriname leader’s son pleads guilty to courting Hezbollah

    Read more

  • British killer escapes from French psychiatric hospital

    Read more

  • Chelsea’s Torres set for AC Milan switch

    Read more

  • Police hunt for British boy with brain tumour taken to France

    Read more

  • France shines in IMF list of world’s promising economists

    Read more

  • Mapping Ukraine: Canada and Russia in ‘tweet for tat’ row

    Read more

  • First case of Ebola confirmed in Senegal

    Read more

  • Obama has 'no strategy yet' on potential Syria strikes

    Read more

  • Netflix to woo French with ‘House of Cards’ set in Marseille

    Read more

  • French businesses ‘hoping for a new Thatcher’

    Read more

  • Syrian refugees surpass 3 million, UN says

    Read more

  • West backs Ukrainian claims of Russian incursion

    Read more

  • Libyan PM resigns as Islamists set up rival administration

    Read more

  • UN says 43 peacekeepers captured in Golan Heights

    Read more

  • The deleted tweets of Manuel Valls

    Read more

  • Peru seizes record 6.5 tonnes of Europe-bound cocaine

    Read more

Kuwaiti cabinet resigns in new political crisis

Latest update : 2008-03-17

Kuwaiti cabinet ministers resigned en masse, according to KUNA news agency. The move is said to have come after ministers complained of a lack of cooperation from the parliament.

Kuwaiti cabinet ministers resigned en masse on Monday, the official news agency KUNA reported, in the latest political crisis to hit the oil-rich Gulf emirate.
  
"First deputy premier and defence minister and the rest of ministers have submitted their resignations to Prime Minister Sheikh Nasser Mohammad al-Ahmad al-Sabah," state minister for cabinet affairs Faisal al-Hajji said.
  
A number of MPs said the prime minister will submit the cabinet's resignation to deputy emir and crown prince Sheikh Nawaf al-Al-ahmad al-Sabah as the ruler is out of the country.
  
Parliamentary sources said the move came after ministers complained of a "lack of cooperation" from the outspoken parliament which was due to vote Tuesday on a law to increase Kuwaiti salaries by 50 dinars (188 dollars) a month.
  
The legislation was strongly opposed by the government which last month raised salaries of citizens by 120 dinars (450 dollars), an increase that was seen as inadequate by the opposition-dominated parliament.
  
Under the Kuwaiti constitution, the emir may either accept the cabinet's resignation and form a new government or dissolve parliament and call for early elections.
  
The last legislative election was in May 2006 following a standoff between parliament and the govemnment.
  
The emir has faced calls recently to sack the government, appoint a new premier and hold early parliamentary polls in the emirate, which has undergone a series of political crises in recent years.
  
Kuwait, the fourth largest OPEC producer, is experiencing sectarian tensions after activists from the Shiite minority held a rally to mourn former Lebanon's Hezbollah commander Imad Mughnieh, killed in a car bombing last month.
  
Leading liberal MP Ahmad al-Mulaifi last week said the government should go, and called for the reform of the ruling Al-Sabah family. He said the premier, a a nephew of the emir, had failed to carry out reforms and resolve the nation's crises.
  
Sheikh Nasser was appointed premier for the first time two years ago after Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah ascended to the helm following a power struggle.
  
Since then, Kuwait has undergone a series of political crises that forced the resignation of three governments, dissolving parliament and holding fresh elections in June 2006 and several ministers being grilled by MPs.
  
A number of MPs welcomed the cabinet resignation saying it could help to resolving the emirate's crises.
  
"The cabinet resignation is timely. The problem in Kuwait is that the government does not have a majority in parliament," Islamist MP Ahmad Baqer said.
  
"The cabinet resignation is a good news. We welcome holding fresh elections," independent MP Ali al-Deqbasi told reporters.

Date created : 2008-03-17

COMMENT(S)