Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola virus: US health institute says cases could top 1.4 million by January

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

New "cuddles-only" dating app hits the market

Read more

DEBATE

Strikes Over Syria (part 2)

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Is somthing a-brewing in Britain since Scottish referendum?

Read more

DEBATE

Strikes Over Syria

Read more

ENCORE!

30 years of Americana through Jean-Pierre Laffont's lens

Read more

FOCUS

A little bit of Africa in Paris

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Frenchman kidnapped in Algeria: 'IS'-linked jihadists claim abduction of 55-year-old tourist

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

EU budget deficits: Time to be more flexible?

Read more

Fitna: Jihadist strikes back

Latest update : 2008-04-26

A Jihad militant released a response to the controversial film "Fitna" by far-right Dutch MP Geert Wilders, publishing a video on an al Qaeda affiliated website in which the unidentified author denounces Christians and Jews as terrorists.

An al Qaeda-linked website has posted a 10-minute film showing civilians killed or maimed in U.S. and Israeli air strikes as an answer to an anti-Koran film released by Dutch lawmaker Geert Wilders last month.  The video, billed as a “response to the film called ‘fitna’ produced by the hateful crusader Wilders”, is dedicated more to criticising the U.S.-led “war on terror” than Wilders himself.

 

Wilders’ film, titled “fitna” or “strife” in Arabic, warns that Muslim immigration is undermining Western values and urges Muslims to tear out “hate-filled” verses from the Koran. It mixes images of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the United States and other bombings with quotations from Islam’s holy book.

 

Muslim nations condemned Wilders’ film as offensive and the Dutch government distanced itself from him to avert the kind of backlash Denmark faced over the publication of cartoons lampooning Islam’s Prophet Mohammad.

 

The response, posted on an al Qaeda-linked website that has carried videos from Osama bin Laden, paints U.S.-led wars as modern-day Crusades led by U.S. President George W. Bush, a devout Christian whose two terms in office were won with strong backing from the religious right.

 

One in four U.S. adults count themselves as evangelical or “born again”, giving them political clout in the United States.

 

The film was described as an Al-Muraiqib production but its makers did not identify themselves further. It opens with marching soldiers before cutting to a poster reading “Jesus Camp: America is born again”.

 

The first half is a compilation mixing clips of bombs hurtling down from U.S. military planes with images of mangled corpses or wounded children in countries from Iraq to the Palestinian territories, Afghanistan and Vietnam.

 

In a swipe at the U.S. president, it shows an image of a Crusader knight dubbed with Bush’s comment about “this crusade” against terrorism. The remark, made after the Sept. 11 attacks, evoked for many Muslims the military campaigns by medieval Christians against Islam.

 

“Nazarenes and Jews are the terrorists and their past and their present bear witness to this,” read a statement presenting the film. “The true enemy of Islam is the Crusader Pope, God curse him, and the leader of the Crusader campaign Bush.”

 

The film’s second half quotes intellectuals from Mahatma Ghandi to Leo Tolstoy and George Bernard Shaw praising the Prophet.

 

Wilders, leader of the right-wing Freedom Party (PVV), posted his short video on the Internet in March.

 

His film starts and ends with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammad with a bomb in his turban. Caricatures of the Prophet, first published in Danish papers, ignited violent protests around the world in 2006.

Date created : 2008-04-26

COMMENT(S)