Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

Is Carla Bruni against a political comeback for Sarkozy?

Read more

DEBATE

Clone of Pakistan Protests: Democracy put the test (Part Two)

Read more

DEBATE

Pakistan Protests: Democracy put the test (Part One)

Read more

ENCORE!

The French Maestro of Soul

Read more

FOCUS

US tobacco giants want lion's share of e-cigarette business

Read more

ENCORE!

Bold and bonkers: Kate Bush is back on stage

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Simon Serfaty, US foreign policy specialist

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'It's a War, Stupid!'

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

French PM calls on ECB to go further to help economy

Read more

  • UN backs inquiry of IS group’s alleged crimes in Iraq

    Read more

  • French education ministry picture sparks racist abuse

    Read more

  • Video: Ukraine’s children return to school as fighting rages on

    Read more

  • US urges Israel to reverse West Bank land seizure

    Read more

  • Americans detained in North Korea call for US help

    Read more

  • Lesotho PM calls for regional peacekeeping force after ‘coup’

    Read more

  • Ukrainian forces retreat from Luhansk airport after clashes

    Read more

  • Teddy Riner, France’s unstoppable judo champion

    Read more

  • Death toll rises in Paris apartment building blast

    Read more

  • Iraqi forces free Amerli in biggest victory over IS militants since June

    Read more

  • French police arrest hungry hedgehog hunters

    Read more

  • Tripoli under control of militias, says government

    Read more

  • Monaco’s Falcao set for Man Utd loan on transfer deadline day

    Read more

  • Spain orders custody for parents of ill British boy

    Read more

  • Anti-government protesters storm Pakistan's state TV

    Read more

  • Web doc on French self-immolation protests takes top prize

    Read more

Interpol confirms captured FARC data

Latest update : 2008-05-15

Interpol confirmed Thursday that information on seized computers was indeed that of the FARC, but the international police agency would not confirm the US and Colombian allegation that the group is receiving funds from Venezuela.

BOGOTA, May 15 - Interpol, the international police
agency, said on Thursday documents found on Colombian rebel
computers, which Colombia's government charges show that Venezuela
and Ecuador supported leftist guerrillas, were authentic.
 

However, the agency did not verify the contents of the files
captured in a Colombian military raid on a Marxist rebel camp in
Ecuador in March in which a top guerrilla leader was killed.
 

Revelations from the three laptops, hard drives and
computer data keys are fueling tensions in the Andean region,
where Colombian is Washington's closest ally and Venezuela and
Ecuador are fierce U.S. critics.
 

"Interpol concludes there was no tampering with any data,"
Interpol chief Ronald Noble said through an interpreter in a
Bogota news conference. "Our only motive was to find out
whether there was any tampering."
 

Colombia invited Interpol to carry out forensic tests to
guarantee it had not tried to manipulate the material found on
three laptops and other hardware captured in the raid.
 

Colombian and U.S. officials, who label the rebels as
terrorists, say the documents show Venezuelan officials provided
support to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC, who
are fighting Latin America's oldest insurgency.
 

State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said the United
States was highly disturbed that Venezuela might be actively
aiding the rebels.
 

"There are serious allegations about Venezuela supplying arms
and support to a terrorist organization," he said.
 

Venezuela and Ecuador dismiss the accusations as false and
part of a U.S.-backed campaign to discredit their governments.
They say any contacts with rebels were only part of humanitarian
efforts to free guerrilla hostages.
 

"The government of Colombia is capable of provoking a war
with Venezuela to justify the intervention of the United
States," Chavez said recently. "Whatever they want they will
find -- it's ridiculous."
 

U.S. officials portray Chavez as a threat to regional
stability as he pushes his socialist revolution. The former
soldier counters Washington wants to oust him.
 

The computer evidence has generated talk in the U.S.
Congress about whether Washington will seek sanctions against
Chavez. But analysts say that measure is complicated because
Venezuela is a key U.S. oil supplier.
 

Date created : 2008-05-15

COMMENT(S)