Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

TALKING EUROPE

Nigel Farage, Leader of the UK Independence Party

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Endocrine disruptors: Is the EU doing enough to protect its citizens' health?

Read more

WEB NEWS

Israelis taking bomb shelter selfies

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Pavlo Klimkin, Ukrainian Foreign Minister

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Raed Fahmi, former Iraqi Minister of Science and Technology

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Germany's World Cup title

Read more

FASHION

Paris, Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2014-2015

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Farnborough air show takes off but F-35 jet is grounded

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Bastille Day celebrations

Read more

  • France commemorates WWI centenary on Bastille Day

    Read more

  • In pictures: 2014 World Cup historic moments

    Read more

  • Kremlin mulls 'retaliatory strikes' after death of Russian civilian

    Read more

  • Boules and booze: Bastille Day à la New Yorkaise

    Read more

  • Senegal honours the soldiers who fought for France in WWI

    Read more

  • Clashes erupt in Paris as thousands march to support Palestinians

    Read more

  • Shipwrecked Costa Concordia successfully refloated

    Read more

  • Germany defeat Argentina 1-0 to win fourth World Cup title

    Read more

  • Paris’s Bastille Day fireworks ‘a homage to victims’ of WWI

    Read more

  • Thousands flee northern Gaza after Israeli warning

    Read more

  • Major differences remain as deadline looms in Iran nuclear talks

    Read more

  • Rival Libyan militias exchange heavy fire at Tripoli airport

    Read more

  • French military to extend Mali 'counterterrorism' operations into Sahel

    Read more

Ivory sale infuriates animal activists

©

Latest update : 2008-07-17

Four African countries will sell between 50 and 100 tons of ivory to Chinese and Japanese buyers, infuriating activists and the organization Animal Rights Africa, who blame those countries for inciting illegal elephant culling.

South African animal rights activists reacted furiously on Wednesday after a decision to allow China to import ivory from the region, saying it spells disaster for African elephants.
  
China, one of the world's biggest consumers of elephant ivory, will be allowed to import 51 tonnes of ivory from South Africa after a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) decision licensed the country as an ivory buyer on Tuesday.
  
"This sale has literally given the green light to the international poaching syndicates and organised crime and will present a nightmare to poorly resourced wildlife enforcement agencies in Africa," said Animal Rights Africa in a statement.
  
"In real terms this represents the death of an estimated 7,699 South African elephants (1.8 tusks per elephant and 3.68kg per tusk)."
  
The group also accused South Africa's government of being "one of the main proponents for the continuation of the immoral ivory trade."
  
"Annually more than 20,000 elephants are killed for the illegal ivory trade and Chinese nationals have already been implicated in illegal ivory seizures by law enforcement agencies in 20 African countries." 
  
Other African countries, such as Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe were also involved in the agreement.
  
CITES, which groups 173 countries, banned international trade in ivory in 1989. But from 1997 onwards it authorised a few African nations to hold ivory sales at regular intervals.
  
ARA spokeswoman Michele Pickover said CITES was merely a pro-trade organisation that had failed wild animals.
  
"What is even more abhorrent is that the South African government is already licking its lips at the prospect of this dishonourable and blood-soaked deal. We are also horrified that Britain and the EU supported this sale."
  
China is one of the world's main destinations of illegal ivory from poached African elephants.
  
South Africa recently lifted a moratorium on elephant culling after a 13-year ban saw a sharp rise in population numbers.

Date created : 2008-07-16

Comments

COMMENT(S)