Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - July 25th, 2014

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Search of Air Algerie crash site continues

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Sarkozy, Hollande and the scooter wars

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Confusion online over Air Algérie flight

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - July 25th, 2014 (part 2)

Read more

REPORTERS

Halal tourism on the rise

Read more

ENCORE!

Tunisia's Carthage International Festival turns 50

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

WWI Centenary: the battle for Verdun

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

When big companies want to do good

Read more

  • Gaza conflict rages on despite pledges of truce

    Read more

  • France calls on its nationals to leave Libya as violence escalates

    Read more

  • Video: Slaviansk mourns mass grave victims

    Read more

  • Nibali joins elite group with Tour de France win

    Read more

  • Boko Haram kidnap Cameroon minister's wife in deadly attack

    Read more

  • Muslims prepare for Eid al-Fitr festival

    Read more

  • ‘Irresponsible’ American dad tries to scale Mont Blanc with children

    Read more

  • Ukraine fighting prevents observers from accessing MH17 crash site

    Read more

  • In pictures: Crowds flock to enjoy the Tour de France show

    Read more

  • Netanyahu says Hamas 'violating its own ceasefire'

    Read more

  • Video: At the scene of the Air Algérie crash in Mali

    Read more

  • Costa Concordia arrives in port of Genoa to be scrapped

    Read more

  • In pictures: Youths clash with police at banned Gaza protest

    Read more

  • Russia lashes out at new EU sanctions over Ukraine

    Read more

  • Bodies of all Air Algérie crash victims to be brought to France

    Read more

  • Syrian army and ISIS both claim advances

    Read more

  • Briton kidnapped in Yemen freed after five months

    Read more

  • New round of Gaza ceasefire talks takes place in Paris

    Read more

US backs Korea over disputed islets

Latest update : 2008-07-31

South Korea on Thursday applauded a US decision qualify a group of islets, claimed by both Seoul and Tokyo, as territory belonging to South Korea. A US geography agency had previously labeled the islets "disputed", sparking Korean wrath.

South Korea on Thursday applauded a US decision to restore the status of a group of disputed islets, claimed by both Seoul and Tokyo, as territory belonging to South Korea.
   
"This is the result of South Korea-US alliance and trust having been restored," presidential spokesman Lee Dong-Kwan said in a statement.
   
"The exceptionally swift measure reflects President George W. Bush's full understanding of the South Korean public sentiment and the deep trust and friendship between the leaders of the two countries."
   
Fueling a long-running dispute between South Korea and Japan, the US government's Board on Geographic Names recently changed its classification of the islets from a territory of South Korea to "undesignated sovereignty."
   
At Bush's instruction, the US board on Wednesday reversed its week-long decision and classified the islets back as a territory of South Korea.
   
South Korean Prime Minister Han Seung-Soo had previously called the US board's move "very regrettable," while Seoul officials said President Lee Myung-Bak -- who will welcome Bush to South Korea next week -- was "outraged".
   
Bush will visit South Korea and Thailand ahead of attending the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in Beijing on August 8.
   
South Korea staged a military drill near the group of rocky and treeless islets, called Dokdo in Korea and Takeshima in Japan, on Wednesday, one day after the first-ever visit there by Han, to cement its claims over them.
   
The dispute flared again this month when Japan announced new education guidelines stressing its territorial claims to the islets.
   
Seoul has summoned its top envoy to Japan in protest.
   
The territorial row originates in Japan's 20th century imperial expansion and its colonisation of the Korean peninsula.
   
Japan claimed the islands in 1905 after winning a war with Russia. It went on to annex the entire Korean peninsula from 1910 until its defeat in 1945 at the end of World War II. Seoul now plans to make them livable for people.

Date created : 2008-07-31

COMMENT(S)