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Tsvangirai leaves talks, 'most likely' to resume Wednesday

Latest update : 2008-08-12

Zimbabwe opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai and others from his MDC party walked out of negotiations with President Robert Mugabe, though the MDC insisted discussions were not closed.

Zimbabwe's opposition left power-sharing talks to resolve the country's political crisis on Tuesday night, but one of the chief negotiators said discussions were "still alive."
   
Opposition Movement for Democratic Change chief Morgan Tsvangirai left the talks after arriving more than three hours earlier, saying only that South African President Thabo Mbeki, the mediator for the negotiations, would issue a statement.
   
The chief negotiator for Tsvangirai's party, Tendai Biti, left later, saying the talks would "most likely" resume on Wednesday.
   
"They have not collapsed," he said.
   
Arthur Mutambara, the head of a smaller MDC faction who has also been participating in the negotiations, exited the talks afterward and made only a brief statement.
   
"The facilitator, President Mbeki, will be carrying out a press conference to outline the state of the negotiations," he said.
   
"We as a party will be carrying out a press conference tomorrow."
   
Tuesday's talks were a third day of negotiations between Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe, Tsvangirai and Mutambara.
   
The meetings follow Mugabe's re-election in a June run-off poll widely condemned as a sham.
   
Tsvangirai boycotted the election despite finishing ahead of Mugabe in the March first round, citing rising violence against his supporters.

Date created : 2008-08-12

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