Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

No strategy and a beige suit

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 29 August 2014 (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 29 August 2014

Read more

ENCORE!

Alain Choquette: A Hilarious Magician in Paris

Read more

FOCUS

France welcomes Iraqi Christian refugees

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Emmanuel Macron: A new economy minister with a pro-business agenda

Read more

THE OBSERVERS

More of this year's best Observers stories

Read more

#TECH 24

Changing the world, one video game at a time

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Socialist Party summer conference kicks off in explosive atmosphere

Read more

  • Exclusive: Fabius warns of further sanctions against Russia

    Read more

  • EU leaders meet in Brussels to seek a response to Russia

    Read more

  • IMF stands behind Lagarde amid French corruption probe

    Read more

  • Experimental Ebola drug ‘ZMapp’ heals all monkeys in study

    Read more

  • British killer escapes from French psychiatric hospital

    Read more

  • Ukraine to relaunch NATO membership bid

    Read more

  • Police hunt for British boy with brain tumour taken to France

    Read more

  • Suriname leader’s son pleads guilty to courting Hezbollah

    Read more

  • Mapping Ukraine: Canada and Russia in ‘tweet for tat’ row

    Read more

  • France shines in IMF list of world’s promising economists

    Read more

  • Chelsea’s Torres set for AC Milan switch

    Read more

  • First case of Ebola confirmed in Senegal

    Read more

  • West backs Ukrainian claims of Russian incursion

    Read more

  • Obama has 'no strategy yet' on potential Syria strikes

    Read more

  • Netflix to woo French with ‘House of Cards’ set in Marseille

    Read more

  • French businesses ‘hoping for a new Thatcher’

    Read more

  • The deleted tweets of Manuel Valls

    Read more

  • Libyan PM resigns as Islamists set up rival administration

    Read more

  • Syrian refugees surpass 3 million, UN says

    Read more

  • UN says 43 peacekeepers captured in Golan Heights

    Read more

  • Peru seizes record 6.5 tonnes of Europe-bound cocaine

    Read more

Democrats descend on Denver for party convention

Latest update : 2008-08-25

Delegates arrived in Denver on the eve of the Democratic convention during which Barack Obama, the first African-American candidate from a major party, will be officially nominated for the White House.

Obama picks Delaware Sen. Joseph Biden as his running mate


Special Report on the race to the White House

 

Democrats launch a star-studded party to rally around Barack Obama's historic White House bid Monday, with Hillary Clinton set for a symbolic gesture of unity after their tense primary showdown.
  
Obama, 47, who will become the first black presidential nominee, said Sunday he will try to convince voters he is just a normal middle class American despite his exotic upbringing and Republican claims he is an elitist.
  
"You'll find out, 'he's pretty much like us,'" Obama told supporters referring to himself, days after lambasting his Republican rival John McCain for being unable to say how many homes he owns with his multi-millionaire wife.
  
Though the Democratic National Convention is Obama's moment in the spotlight, his primary foe Hillary Clinton will be watched almost as closely, under intense pressure to unify the party after their bitter nominating clash.
  
As Republicans picked at the wounds of their marathon battle, a Democratic official said on condition of anonymity Sunday that Clinton was expected to release her haul of delegates, leaving them free to vote for Obama in Wednesday's symbolic roll-call vote.
  
The former first lady will host a reception for her delegates piled up in a countrywide string of primaries and caucuses in the first six months of this year, a day after addressing the convention on Tuesday night.
  
Republicans however are attempting to play on the anger of Clinton supporters who feel their heroine was deprived of her rightful spot as the nominee, or even a vice presidential nod, partly through sexism.
  
A hard-hitting McCain political ad said Clinton had been passed over for "speaking the truth" about Obama's political agenda during their acrimonious battle.
  
"The truth hurt, and Obama didn't like it," said the ad, issued a day after the presumptive Democratic nominee chose veteran senator and foreign policy expert Joseph Biden as his number two.
  
Former New York mayor Rudolph Giuliani meanwhile suggested Obama, who Republicans say is woefully inexperienced, had been too weak to put a formidable figure like Clinton on the ticket.
  
On the eve of the convention, anticipation was building over a rumored appearance by cancer-stricken Senator Edward Kennedy, in what could be an emotional farewell from a liberal icon who held previous conventions in thrall.
  
Another highlight on Monday will be a speech by Obama's wife Michelle, who will attempt to portray her husband as a father and family man, despite finding herself a target during the campaign of attacks by conservatives.
  
The Democratic convention, followed next week by the Republican gathering in St. Paul, Minnesota, comes after McCain cut Obama's opinion poll lead and wrenched the race into a statistical tie, ahead of November's election.
  
A Washington Post-ABC News survey released Sunday indicated the Illinois senator's four-point lead was almost within the margin of error.
  
Some 49 percent of likely voters support Obama and 45 percent back McCain, according to the poll, taken before the Illinois senator announced Biden as his vice presidential running mate.
  
The survey showed Obama continued to lead on the economy, and at a better than two to one margin, voters saw him as the more optimistic candidate.
  
Other polls however show that Americans still see McCain, a veteran 71-year-old senator and former prisoner of war, as the more credible commander-in-chief, a deficit he will try to make up at the convention.
  
As Republicans try to widen Democratic divisions, polls also show that many Clinton voters are undecided about whether to vote for Obama or McCain.
  
The Washington Post-ABC poll found 20 percent of those who voted for her in the primary duel now favor McCain, underlining questions about the Democratic candidate's appeal to some core, blue-collar Democrats.
  
Last week, a Wall Street Journal poll found only half of Clinton's voters said they would definitely vote for Obama in November. One in five said they would pick McCain.
  
A flurry of celebrities are reported to be heading for Denver during the convention, including the likes of Ben Affleck and Bruce Springsteen, to generate Hollywood buzz on the fringe of the convention.

Date created : 2008-08-25

COMMENT(S)