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Russians, Georgians and Ossetians together in the buffer zone

Latest update : 2008-08-30

Russian troops patrol the buffer zone separating South Ossetia from the rest of Georgia. Here, the few remaining Georgians fear they may be forced to take on Russian citizenship. Watch Romain Goguelin's report.

 

Thirty kilometres inside Georgian territory, Russian soldiers are patrolling what South Ossetia considers to be its new borders.

 

Inside this buffer zone, the Georgian population has mostly disappeared. A handful, however, refuse to leave, suggesting they’d rather be killed than take on a new nationality.

 

Nearby, an Ossetian officer is scarcely reassuring. While no-one will be forced to change passports, he points out, “it’s always better to have official papers in an independent republic.”

Date created : 2008-08-30

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