Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

Israeli strikes on Gaza as seen on social media

Read more

DEBATE

Africa's Newest Failed State: How to Stop Civil War and Famine in South Sudan? (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

Israel and the Palestinians: How to Break the Cycle of Violence?

Read more

DEBATE

Africa's Newest Failed State: How to Stop Civil War and Famine in South Sudan?

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Somalia : Al Shebab attack on presidential palace

Read more

FOCUS

Sharia law to be enshrined in British legal system?

Read more

ENCORE!

How a comedy dud became one of France's biggest box office hits

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Kenya: Clashes at anti-government rally in Nairobi

Read more

WEB NEWS

ISIS leader challenged over expensive-looking wristwatch

Read more

  • Palestinian death count tops 60 as Israeli airstrikes pound Gaza

    Read more

  • Argentina beat the Netherlands on penalties to reach World Cup final

    Read more

  • Foiled French jihadist ‘targeted Louvre and Eiffel Tower’

    Read more

  • Obama in Texas to urge action on child migrant crisis

    Read more

  • Iraq’s heritage 'in danger' from ISIS militants

    Read more

  • Froome crashes out of Tour de France

    Read more

  • South Sudan independence heroes ‘have lost their way’

    Read more

  • Dozens of blindfolded bodies found south of Baghdad

    Read more

  • Alps Murder wife had ex-husband who died on same day

    Read more

  • Both candidates say they won Indonesian presidential election

    Read more

  • Brazil players should never wear 'sacred uniform' again, press says

    Read more

  • Exiled Syrian opposition elects new president

    Read more

  • China’s first Tour de France cyclist chases his dream

    Read more

  • Ukraine imposes new conditions on peace talks with pro-Russia rebels

    Read more

  • Sarkozy's UMP party 'almost €80 million in debt'

    Read more

Google Chrome raises user privacy concerns

©

Latest update : 2008-09-08

The launch of Chrome – Google’s web browser – has raised questions about the protection of the private lives of its users. Critics argue that it allows the US company to monitor every aspect of one's online activity.

Just as Germany is in the process of reviewing the laws governing the release of personal information over the Internet, the launch of Chrome--Google's web browser--has raised questions about the protection of the private lives of its users.

The user license for the browser authorises Google, in complicated legalese, to monitor the user’s entire web browsing.

In effect, the users authorise Google to collect their search history, which then allows the American Internet giant to create precise profiles of its users. These listings are extremely valuable, and would allow advertisers to target their wares more precisely online.

That information would also allow Google, the world’s top online ad carrier since its buyout of Doubleclick in April 2007, to enter a goldmine.

But the Google Chrome license has raised a furor. Article 11 of the original document stipulates that users forego their rights to all data created or put online via Chrome.

Google insists that this is an error created by the partial overlap of Chrome’s licence agreement with that of another of their products. They have since changed the terms of the licence.

But that has not stopped criticism. Omnibox, the field that combines a search engine with an address bar, sends all entered words to Google in real time, thus permitting the engine to “suggest” certain results. In other words, Google receives everything that the user types, while the user is typing it.

All these functions are activated automatically, but the user can, after several maneouvers, stop the process of sending personal data, by deactivating the “suggestion” function on the browser. This has not stopped consumer protection organizations from sending alarm bells the world over.

“We are concerned that Chrome will be a kind of giant magic carpet that transports our private information directly to the Google database,” said Peter Eckersley, a member of the US organization Electronic Frontier Foundation, on Cnet News. “Google already knows too much about what everyone is thinking at any moment.”

Date created : 2008-09-04

Comments

COMMENT(S)