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Controversy over Edvige database still going strong

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Latest update : 2008-09-10

Edvige is a copy of a former intelligence information bank created in 1991 with new fields such as mention of handicap and political or religious involvement. These new entries have provoked outrage both inside and outside the government.

On the same topic: "Police database criticised by French rights groups"   

 

The French government moved Tuesday to quell a public outcry over a new police database set up to gather information on suspects as young as 13 and on political, religious and trade union activists.
  
Interior Minister Michele Alliot-Marie conceded that minors may be erased from the so-called "Edvige" files if, after a given period of time, they have been cleared of any criminal suspicion.
  
"I have heard that there are worries. I want to dispel these worries and all ambiguity," said Alliot-Marie.
  
"I believe we can indeed limit the period of time during which information is kept in the files," she said.
  
Set up on July 1 by government decree, the Edvige database will serve to keep track on anyone "likely to disrupt public order" and will be run by the new public security police directorate (DCSP).
  
About 100 civil liberties associations have launched a petition collecting some 120,000 signatures while 13 complaints challenging its legality have been lodged at the state council, France's highest administrative court.
  
Similar to internal security systems used in Britain and the United States, the Edvige database has raised concerns, with the defence minister at the weekend questioning the rationale for such a sophisticated tool.
  
Human rights minister Rama Yade acknowledged on Tuesday that "clarifications" were needed, in particular on whether information on a person's sexual orientation will be kept on file.
  
"The decree that created this database is raising worries. I believe that it is important to dispel them," said Yade in an interview to Europe 1 radio.
  
Alliot-Marie said the Edvige database was simply the continuation of another computerized file system set up in 1991 by the Renseignements Generaux (RG) police intelligence.
  
She said the new database was "adapted" to new laws and offered assurances that its use would be "strictly controlled".
  
But the interior minister stood firm on calls to scrap another database, called Cristina, run by the state's counter-terrorism agency and considered top secret.
  
"Cristina is protecting the French against terrorism. This is the heart of security," said Alliot-Marie.
  
The Socialist opposition has appealed to the government to withdraw the decree setting up Edvige while a group of 12 unions and rights groups have called a national protest for October 16.
  
Defence Minister Herve Morin at the weekend openly questioned the rationale for the sweeping new domestic spy system that will track political, business or religious leaders as well as trade union activists.
  
Prime Minister Francois Fillon on Monday declared that the government was united behind its plan to use Edvige and dismissed suggestion that it amounted to a Big Brother-type state spying on its citizens.
  
"There is a reality in our country and it is a clear reality in terms of security," the prime minister added.

Date created : 2008-09-09

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