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The Murder of Boris Nemtsov: Who Killed Charismatic Opposition Figure? (part two)

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The Murder of Boris Nemtsov: Who Killed Charismatic Opposition Figure?

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'Agent Storm': How a militant Islamist became a CIA spy

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China: New reform set to benefit migrants

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THE OBSERVERS

Caged children in Syria and dumpster diving in Ivory Coast

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Deadly clashes between Turkish army and Kurdish rebels

Latest update : 2008-10-05

Fifteen Turkish soldiers and 23 Kurdish rebels were killed during a rebel attack on a military post near the Iraqi border in the country's south-east, the Anatolia news agency quoted an army spokesman as saying Saturday.

Fifteen Turkish soldiers were killed in clashes with Kurdish PKK separatist rebels in southeast Turkey on Friday, Turkey's General Staff said, in one of the deadliest attacks on the military this year.
 
It said at least 23 members of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) were killed in the fighting in the Semdinli region bordering Iraq and Iran.
 
Turkey's military has staged several cross-border operations, including a brief land offensive in February, against PKK bases in mountainous northern Iraq over the past 12 months.
 
Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan asked parliament last month to extend a mandate, which expires later this month, to launch further military operations against the PKK in Iraq.
 
Ankara blames the PKK, considered a terrorist organisation by the United States and the European Union, for the deaths of more than 40,000 people since it launched its campaign for an ethnic Kurdish homeland in southeast Turkey in 1984. 

Date created : 2008-10-04

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