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Angola tries to stop arms trafficking trial

Latest update : 2008-10-07

As 42 French personalities suspected of illegal arms appear in a Paris court over the so-called "Angolagate" scandal, the Angolan government called for the trial to be annulled, citing a breach of state security.

Also read:

Angola tries to stop 'Angolagate' trial

French elite on trial in 'Angolagate'

 

 

A president's son, a thriller writer and a former interior minister were among members of the French elite who went on trial Monday for illegal arms sales to Africa in a high-profile case dubbed "Angolagate."
  
However, the Angolan regime asked for the incriminating evidence to be withdrawn before the trial even started, citing a state security breach. A lawyer representing the Luanda government invoked French confidentiality laws protecting military secrets of foreign countries.
  
“We ask that all the trial documents that violate international public order shall not be publicly discussed,” explained Ms Teitgen, who defends the Angolan Republic.

 

According to Ms Teitgen, the documents cited are diplomatic notes and contracts, which are the basis of the accusations.

  

Date created : 2008-10-07

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