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Canadian convicted on terror charges

Text by REUTERS

Latest update : 2008-10-29

Mohammed Momin Khawaja, the first Canadian tried under the country's new anti-terrorism law, was found guilty of five offenses, including knowingly participating in a foiled plot against several targets in Britain.

 

A Canadian man who was the first to be charged under a tough new anti-terror law was found guilty on Wednesday in a trial linked to a plot to carry out bomb attacks in Britain.

 

Judge Douglas Rutherford of the Ontario Superior Court ruled that software engineer Momin Khawaja was involved in a terrorist group and was aware that it was involved in terrorist activity.

 

He found him guilty of five of seven terrorism offenses, and also found him guilty of two separate criminal offenses of having worked on a device to activate a bomb detonator and possessing an explosive substance.

 

"I found you guilty as charged," Rutherford said, addressing Khawaja, standing impassively behind glass, flanked by two police officers. He was wearing leg shackles and a light suit and had a tight-clipped beard.

 

British police had named Khawaja as co-conspirator in the case of five men who were jailed for life last year for a thwarted plan to bomb nightclubs, trains and a shopping center in Britain.

 

But he did not stand trial there and has been held in prison since 2004 in Ottawa, where he underwent a separate trial. He will be sentenced on Nov. 18 and faces the possibility of life in prison.

 

He had pleaded not guilty on all counts.

Date created : 2008-10-29

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