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French sisters win discrimination suit against firm

Text by AFP

Latest update : 2008-11-13

Muslim twin sisters who sued their former employers, London brokers Tradition Securities and Futures, for religious discrimination and sexual misconduct, reached an out-of-court settlement, lawyers said on Wednesday.

 
Twin Muslim sisters who sued a London financial services firm for religious discrimination and sexual misconduct have reached an out-of-court settlement with their former employers, lawyers said Wednesday.
   
Media reports said Hanan and Samira Fariad, 31, French nationals of Moroccan origin, demanded up to 10 million pounds (15 million dollars, 12 million euros) in damages from brokers Tradition Securities and Futures (TSAF).
   
Both sides refused to confirm the final figure. Britain's biggest-ever employment tribunal payout stands at 2.8 million pounds, awarded last month in a racial discrimination case.
   
"The parties are pleased to confirm that the matter has now been settled on confidential terms," a TSAF spokeswoman and the twins' law firm Russell Jones and Walker said in a statement.
   
The twins made more than 100 allegations against TSAF, notably accusing their employers of religious discrimination by transferring Jewish clients away from them. TSAF denies the claims.
   
"TSAF considers the central claim of religious discrimination allegedly exemplified by the transfer of Jewish trader clients away from Muslim to Jewish brokers to be an utter distortion of the facts," it said earlier this month.
   
But an employment tribunal heard how staff at the firm in London's financial district allegedly viewed pornography at work and took clients to lap dancing clubs, and made the sisters' working life unbearable with sexist behaviour.
   
One claimed she had to send a photo of herself to a client to secure a deal, the tribunal was told. TSAF tried unsuccessfully to impose a gagging order on the sexual misconduct allegations, preventing media from reporting them.
   
The case began at the employment tribunal on October 29, but was settled out of court this week.
  

Date created : 2008-11-13

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