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Asia-pacific

India says no to military action against Pakistan

Latest update : 2008-12-02

India is not considering military retaliation against Pakistan in the wake of the terrorist attacks in Mumbai, said Foreign Minister Pranab Mukherjee. Earlier, India called on its neighbour to hand over 20 terror suspects.

France24.com's Leela Jacinto is in Mumbai following events as they unfold.  Click here to read her reports, and check out her notebook from the terror-stricken city.

 

Watch our Face Off debate: 'Mumbai: A Pakistani connection?'

 

AFP - India is not considering taking military action against Pakistan over the attacks in Mumbai, Foreign Minister Pranab Mukherjee said Tuesday.
   
"Nobody is talking about military action," Mukherjee told reporters.
   
His comments followed a meeting earlier of India's security cabinet, the top decision-making body on military and diplomatic affairs, which met in the aftermath of last week's Mumbai attacks that claimed 188 lives.
   
"What will be done, time will show and you will come to know," Mukherjee said.
   
Earlier, the minister said India had called on Pakistan to hand over 20 terror suspects, including the founder of the militant group accused of carrying out the carnage in Mumbai.
   
The government demanded "the arrest and handover of those persons who are settled in Pakistan and are fugitives of Indian law," Mukherjee said.
   
"We will await the response of Pakistan," he added.
   
The names come from a list of suspects originally put together by New Delhi after Lashkar-e-Taiba gunmen attacked the Indian parliament in December 2001.
   
The foreign ministry called in the Pakistani High Commissioner late Monday, and demanded Islamabad take "strong action" against what India has described as "elements" in Pakistan behind the Mumbai assault.
   
The men sought by New Delhi include Hafeez Saeed, the founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, a Pakistan-based militant group which has become the focus of investigations into the attacks.
   
Other prominent names include Maulana Masood Azhar, chief of the Jaish-e-Mohammed rebel group, and Dawood Ibrahim, wanted in India on charges of masterminding serial bombings in Mumbai in 1993 that killed around 300 people.
   
Ibrahim was designated as a "global terrorist" by the US Treasury Department in 2003. He is believed to be living in the southern Pakistani city of Karachi.
   
Pakistan has repeatedly ruled out sending any of the men on the list to India and has denied Ibrahim even lives in the country.

Date created : 2008-12-02

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