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Pakistan rejects British request to question Mumbai suspects

Latest update : 2008-12-15

Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani (right) says Pakistan has rejected a request by his British counterpart, Gordon Brown, for the UK to question suspects detained in the wake of the deadly attacks in Mumbai, India.

AFP - Pakistan has turned down a British request to question suspects arrested in connection with the Mumbai attacks, Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani said Monday.
   
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown visited Islamabad at the weekend in a bid to calm tensions between Pakistan and India in the wake of the attacks in the Indian metropolis that left 172 dead.
   
"Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani said that in his meeting on Sunday with the British Prime Minister, he turned down his request for Britain probing the Pakistanis detained after (the) Mumbai attacks," Gilani's office said.
   
Gilani was addressing the federal parliament at the beginning of a general debate on the situation arising out of the Mumbai attacks, it said.
   
"He said he told Gordon Brown that if there were any proofs, these persons will be prosecuted under the law of Pakistan," it said.
   
In his visit to Islamabad, Brown pledged to help Pakistan "break the chain of terror" after holding talks with President Asif Ali Zardari on security in the wake of the Mumbai attacks.
   
At least one British national died in the assault on India's financial centre, and Brown had said he asked Zardari to allow British police to question Pakistani suspects.
   
Brown said Britain would work with the government in Islamabad to ensure that terrorists are denied safe haven in Pakistan, and pledged six million pounds (nine million dollars) to help it tackle militancy.
   
Gilani had earlier Sunday told a reporter in the eastern city of Lahore that once Pakistan had the evidence of proof of involvement of the suspects, then it would consider the request.
   
"We said that no proof has reached us and when proof will reach us, then (you can) talk to us," he said.
 

Date created : 2008-12-15

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