Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

WEB NEWS

Concerns grow as hobby drone use increases

Read more

WEB NEWS

Buffalo residents share stunning images of the snowstorm

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Senegalese photographer's flashbacks to Africans throughout history

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Hollande photographed with Julie Gayet on Elysée Palace balcony

Read more

REVISITED

Is Beirut still haunted by ghosts of the civil war?

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Band Aid 30 - Hit or Miss? Bob Geldof in Hot Water over Ebola Single

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Deal or No Deal with Iran? Home Stretch to Reach Historic Agreement

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Football scandals: The ugly side of the beautiful game

Read more

#THE 51%

Ending violence against women: The dangers of trial by Twitter

Read more

Asia-pacific

Canberra formally rejects Guantanamo inmates

Latest update : 2009-01-03

Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard announced Australia's formal rejection of the latest US-request made in December to take in detainees from the Guantanamo military prison camp based in Cuba.

REUTERS - Australia has rejected all U.S. requests so far to resettle detainees from Guantanamo Bay, the most recent being on Friday night, Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard said on Saturday.
 

A request to resettle a group of prisoners from the military prison camp in Cuba was made last month by the outgoing administration of President George W. Bush, Gillard told reporters in Melbourne.
 

It was the second such request and was rejected on Friday night Australian time, Gillard said.
 

"Those resettlement requests have been considered on a case-by-case basis, against our stringent national security and immigration criteria," said Gillard, who temporarily heads the government while Prime Minister Kevin Rudd is on leave.
 

"Assessing those requests from a case-by-case basis, they had not met our stringent national security and immigration criteria and have been rejected."
 

About 255 men are still held at Guantanamo, including 60 the United States has cleared for release but cannot repatriate for fear they will be tortured or persecuted in their home countries.
 

The prison has come to symbolise aggressive interrogation practices that opened the United States up to allegations of torture.
 

The U.S. State Department last week asked around 100 countries for help clearing the camp of detainees over a two-year period, the Australian newspaper reported.
 

Australia's opposition on Friday strongly criticised the government for considering any requests to accept Guantanamo Bay detainees.
 

The suggestion that Australia might take any of the Guantanamo Bay detainees has been greeted with horror by many Australians.
 

Under conservative former Prime Minister John Howard, Canberra was one of the strongest supporters of Bush's war on terrorism.
 

Date created : 2009-01-03

COMMENT(S)