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Middle east

Radjaa Abou Dagga, a journalist in Gaza

Video by Radjaa ABOU DAGGA

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2009-01-11

FRANCE 24's Gaza correspondent Radjaa Abou Dagga is among a handful of journalists who can report from inside the Gaza Strip. He tells us about the difficulty of being both a reporter and a Palestinian.

"I can tell you it is very hard", said FRANCE 24's Gaza correspondent Radjaa Abou Dagga, one of the few journalists able to cover the conflict from the inside.

Radjaa Abou Dagga is a Palestinian journalist. He risks his life and that of his family every day. But he believes his primary mission is to inform the public. "It is really important for me to keep transmitting the message and to bear witness to what's going on," he said.

"It is a very hard decision to make to stay and be a journalist, to hide your emotions," he added. On January 6, Radjaa Abou Dagga stopped filming to recue a little girl who fell victim to the shelling of a United Nations school in Gaza. "She died in our arms," he said.
 

Click here to send your questions to Radjaa Abou Dagga and to our other reporters in the field.

Date created : 2009-01-11

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