Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

Alpha Condé reacts to Dadis Camara's bid to return home

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

'We need an American in every train compartment'

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

When China Sneezes: World markets rattled by bubble burst (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Desperate to get to Europe: How to handle migrant surge? (part 1)

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Behind the scenes of France's National Assembly

Read more

#TECH 24

Saving water, one shower at a time

Read more

FOCUS

Katrina, ten years on: Young survivors still grapple with trauma

Read more

ENCORE!

Has New Orleans got its groove back?

Read more

REPORTERS

Meet the French troops hunting jihadists in Sahel

Read more

Africa

Suicide car bomber kills civilians in Mogadishu

Latest update : 2009-01-24

A suicide car bomb driving toward a control point manned by African Union peacekeepers in the Somali capital of Mogadishu hit a bus and killed at least 14 civilians, according to a local official.

AFP - At least 14 civilians were killed Saturday  when a suicide car bomb targeting African Union peackeepers in Somalia hit a bus south of the capital Mogadishu, an official said.
   
The explosives-laden car was heading to a control point manned by the AU forces in Mogadishu's southern K4 intersection when a policeman opened fire at the vehicle.
   
"At least 14 civilians died when a would-be suicide bomber hit a civilian bus in Maka Al Mukarama road. A policeman tried to stop him and fired bullets at the car and it hit the bus killing all on board and the bomber himself," Abdifatah Ibrahim Shaweye, Mogadishu's deputy governor told AFP.
   
Shaweye said the suicide bomber was a foreigner after an arm was retrieved from the car wreckage.
   
"We have one of his arms which is clearly showing that the suicide bomber was a foreigner," said Shaweye, explaining that the bomber's light skin tone  showed he was not Somali.
   
The AU forces, comprising 3,400 Ugandan and Burundian soldiers, have often been targeted by Islamist insurgents since deploying to the volatile capital in March 2007.
   
Ethiopia, which sent troops into Somalia to prop up a weak tramsitional government against an Islamist movement, pulled out of Mogadishu earlier this month.
   
Their withdrawal had been one of the main demands of the country's Islamist-led opposition, but hardline militias have vowed to continue fighting against government forces and African peacekeepers.
   
The Ethiopian forces' pullout has also created a security vacuum drawing clan-based militias and warlords into a scramble for control over the capital's various districts.

Date created : 2009-01-24

COMMENT(S)