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Likud in lead ahead of vote, poll shows

Video by Luke BROWN

Latest update : 2009-02-09

Israel's right-of-centre opposition Likud party, led by hawkish former premier Benjamin Netanyahu, remains the favourite ahead of Israel's Feb. 10 elections, according to opinion polls released on Friday.

AFP - Israel's right-wing opposition Likud party, led by former premier Benjamin Netanyahu, remains the frontrunner ahead of next week's elections, according to opinion polls out on Friday.
   
On Friday evening, a poll had Likud garnering 24 seats in the 120-member Knesset, three more than the centrist Kadima party of Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni.
   
The fast-rising far-right Yisrael Beitenou party of Soviet immigrant Avigdor Lieberman would get 17 seats, as would the Labour party of Defence Minister Ehud Barak, according to excerpts of the poll, Globes financial weekly said.
   

Another three surveys published by the main Hebrew-language dailies credited Likud with 25 to 27 MPs and Kadima with 22 to 23.
   
Yisrael Beitenou would scored 18 to 19 and Labour 14 to 17, the lowest score in its history.
   
Netanyahu appears the best placed to become prime minister, and the polls indicate he would obtain a majority in an alliance with other right-wing parties.
   
But the former prime minister has made it clear he would rather form a coalition with Kadima and Labour.
   
The polls published in the three dailies were all conducted among 1,000 potential voters and have a 2.5 percentage point margin of error.
 

Date created : 2009-02-07

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