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Vietnam reports second bird flu victim this year

Latest update : 2009-02-27

A Vietnamese man has died from bird flu, a medical official reported on Friday. The death is the second such case in Vietnam this year, once again raising fears among experts of the potential for a devastating pandemic.

AFP - A 32-year-old man in Vietnam has died of bird flu, becoming the second fatality from the virus in the country so far this year, a medical official said Friday.
  
"The patient, 32, died on February 25," said Nguyen Van Thai, head of the intensive care unit at Hanoi's tropical diseases institute.
  
He had tested positive for the H5N1 strain of the virus earlier this month, said a female doctor at the hospital who did not want to be named.
  
She said he fell sick on Feburary 3 and was moved to the hospital two days later with a high fever and respiratory problems.
  
Vietnam has the world's second highest bird flu death toll after Indonesia, with 54 deaths. They include the latest case and a 23-year-old woman who died earlier this month.
  
According to the latest animal health department report, 11 of 63 provinces across Vietnam have been hit with the H5N1 strain.
  
The H5N1 virus typically spreads from birds to humans via direct contact, but experts fear that it could mutate into a form easily transmissible between humans, with the potential to kill millions in a pandemic.

Date created : 2009-02-27

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