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Asia-pacific

China urges Pyongyang to stay in nuclear talks

©

Video by Regan RANUCCI , Sylviane BAHR

Latest update : 2009-04-14

Following North Korea's announcement that it would pull out of the six-nation nuclear disarmament talks, "never again" to rejoin, China - the nation's sole major ally - urged North Korea to reconsider. China has discouraged new UN sanctions.

AFP - North Korea announced Tuesday it would quit six-nation nuclear disarmament talks and restart its atomic weapons programme in protest at the UN's condemnation of its rocket launch.
   
The communist nation said Security Council discussion of the launch, which it insists sent a satellite into orbit, was "an unbearable insult" to its people.
   
Analysts described the Pyongyang statement as unusually strong. China, the North's sole major ally, urged it to reconsider.
   
"There is no need for the six-party talks any more," said a statement from Pyongyang's foreign ministry carried by the Korean Central News Agency.
   
"We will never again take part in such talks and will not be bound by any agreement reached at the talks."
   
North Korea "will strengthen its nuclear deterrent for its defence by all means", it added.
   
"We will take steps to restore disabled nuclear facilities... and reprocess used fuel rods that came from experimental nuclear reactors."
   
Pyongyang had been disabling plants at Yongbyon that produced weapons-grade plutonium as part of a February 2007 six-nation deal.
   
The vow to quit the talks came hours after the Security Council unanimously approved a statement condemning the April 5 launch, which it said contravened a resolution passed after the North's 2006 missile and nuclear tests.
   
The council agreed to tighten sanctions which were mandated under Resolution 1718 but never enforced amid hopes of progress on denuclearisation.
   
China and Russia successfully resisted calls for a new resolution, saying they did not want to harm prospects for resuming the disarmament talks which group them with the two Koreas, Japan and the United States.
   
China urged the North to stay in the talks.
   
"The Chinese side hopes all sides will... continue to advance and push forward the six-party talks and the denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula," said foreign ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu.
   
Jiang emphasised that China maintained friendly relations with North Korea and opposed any further UN sanctions.
   
Russia's foreign ministry expressed regret while Japan said it "strongly urges" Pyongyang to return to the negotiations.
   
A senior US official said North Korea should not "further isolate itself from the international community" by pulling out of the six-party talks.
   
South Korea's foreign ministry expressed "deep regret".
   
"As the UN Security Council's presidential statement reflects a unified demand by the international community, the government urges North Korea to abide by it and come to the six-way talks," a statement said.
   
Pyongyang had threatened to quit the talks, which started in 2003, should the Security Council criticise its rocket launch.
   
It has hailed what it calls the "historic" launch of a communications satellite. The United States and its allies say no satellite has been detected in orbit and the North's real aim was to test a long-range missile.
   
The North said it would consider building its own light water nuclear reactors to supply electrical power, and blasted what it called double standards.
   
"According to the US logic, Japan may launch a satellite because Japan is its ally but we must not do the same because we have a different system and we are not subservient to the US," the statement said.
   
"The UN Security Council simply yielded to the US robber-like logic."
   
Kim Yong-Hyun, a professor at Seoul's Dongguk University, said Pyongyang's response "raises the possibility of military provocations by North Korea".
   
"North Korea is ratcheting up the stakes. Its brinkmanship, of course, is designed to win maximum concessions from the US and international community," he told AFP.
   
Professor Yang Moo-Jin, of the University of North Korean Studies, said it was one of the strongest statements he could remember from Pyongyang.
   
"The statement says the North is now moving to actions," he said.
   
"It's crucial for the US, its allies and China to react wisely in order to control the situation."
   
A Seoul official involved in the talks said North Korea had completed eight of 11 disablement steps and was on the ninth, which involves withdrawing spent fuel rods from the reactor and placing them in a cooling pond.
   
"It's hard to say how long it would take to put everything back and start reprocessing the spent fuel rods to get plutonium," he told AFP on condition  of anonymity.
 

Date created : 2009-04-14

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