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Jackie Chan warns of 'chaos' from political freedom

Latest update : 2009-04-19

Jackie Chan, the Hong Kong kung fu star famous for movies such as Rush Hour, told a Chinese audience at an economic forum that political freedom in China could lead to chaos "like in Taiwan", reported the Sunday Morning Post newspaper.

AFP - Hong Kong movie legend Jackie Chan told a Chinese audience that too much political freedom can lead to chaos "like in Taiwan," a newspaper report said Sunday.

Chan, best-known for his martial-arts comedies, told an annual meeting of governments and business leaders that China should be wary of allowing too many freedoms, the Sunday Morning Post reported.

"I don't know whether it is better to have freedom or to have no freedom," he said at the Boao Forum for Asia.

"With too much freedom ... it can get very chaotic, could end up like in Taiwan."

The star of the Hollywood blockbuster franchise "Rush Hour" got into trouble in 2004 when he described the Taiwanese presidential elections as the "biggest joke in the world."

Chan also told the forum he would not buy a television made in China because he was afraid it might explode. Instead, he said, he would buy one from Japan.

The 55-year-old's latest film, "Shinjuku Incident", has been banned in China for being too violent, but Chan shied away from criticising Beijing.

"If you want to make a film in China, you have to follow our rules," he told the forum, according to the report.
 

Date created : 2009-04-19

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