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Americas

Mexico toll mounts amid worldwide alert

Video by Claire PRYDE

Latest update : 2009-04-26

Mexico says the new epidemic of swine flu is believed to have killed 81 people in Mexico, with a further 1,300 reported ill. US confirms two cases in Kansas, while New Zealand says ten students are "likely" to have contracted the disease.

AFP - A new flu feared to have killed up to 81 people in Mexico has "pandemic potential," the World Health Organization has warned, as concerns grow of the virus spreading in the US and worldwide.

Mexican Health Minister Jose Angel Cordova late Saturday raised the probable death toll from the new multi-strain swine flu in Mexico to 81, including 20 already confirmed.

Earlier, Mexican President Felipe Calderon published an order giving his government extraordinary powers to tackle the deadly outbreak, as at least two new cases were reported in the United States, bringing the total infected there to 10.

"This virus has clearly a pandemic potential," World Health Organization director general, Margaret Chan, said on Saturday.

The Geneva-based UN agency branded the outbreak "a public health emergency of international concern," following a meeting of its emergency committee.

In a statement, it said it was recommending that all nations "intensify surveillance for unusual outbreaks of influenza-like illness and severe pneumonia".

In Mexico, 13 new suspect cases were reported in the past 24 hours and a total of 1,324 patients with flu symptoms were under investigation, Health Minister Cordova said.

Since April 13, "there have been 81 registered deaths which are probably linked to the virus of which only 20 cases have virological checks," Cordova told a news conference after meeting with health officials from across the country.

The Mexico government has upped emergency measures that were put into place only on Friday.

Officials have canceled hundreds of public events and closed schools for millions of students in and around the capital.

Schools in those areas and also San Luis Potosi in central Mexico, the third most affected area, will remain closed until May 6, Cordova said Saturday.

The new presidential decree meanwhile includes measures to isolate those infected by the rare virus and inspect their homes.

Across the northern border, health authorities in the central US state of Kansas confirmed two cases of swine flu on Saturday, bringing the total number of cases in the United States to at least 10.

One of the victims was still ill, while the other had recovered, Kansas health authorities said. One of the patients had recently traveled to Mexico.

"Both persons ... became ill with the same unique (H1N1) strain of swine flu that has been identified in Mexico, California and Texas," the statement read.

Earlier on Saturday New York officials said eight to nine students at a New York City school were suspected of having swine flu, although test results are still pending.

Meanwhile, a British Airways cabin crew staff member was being treated in a London hospital with "flu-like symptoms" after arriving on a flight from Mexico City, health officials said Saturday.

A spokesman for the hospital said the man was responding well to treatment.

"With infections in many different communities as we're seeing, we don't think that containment is feasible," said Anne Schuchat of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The CDC said some of the Mexican victims had died from the same new strain of swine flu that affected eight people in Texas and California.

Dave Daigle, of the CDC, said a bird flu strain, two swine flu strains and a human strain had combined for the first time.

"The most worrying fact is that it appears to transmit from human to human," said WHO spokesman Thomas Abraham.

These features, along with the fact that unusually young healthy adults have fallen victim in Mexico, and not the very old or very young, have given rise to fears of an epidemic or even a pandemic.

Many Mexico City residents wore freely-distributed surgical masks on the streets Saturday, after authorities urged people to avoid contact in public.

Apart from the capital, four other deaths were in central, northwest and southern Mexico.

Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard said that more than 500 sporting and cultural events had been canceled for at least 10 days.

Mexico City authorities have said they had more than one million doses of suitable antiviral drugs, in an urban area of some 20 million.

No travel restrictions have been placed on Mexico, the government stressed Saturday, adding that they had set up an information campaign in ports and embassies.

Medical teams were on stand-by at Mexico City's international airport, and all passengers had to fill out a health questionnaire, an official said Friday.

According to the WHO, pigs have already been factors in the appearance of two previously unknown diseases that gave rise to pandemics in the last century.

If a pig is simultaneously infected with a human and an avian influenza virus, it can serve as a "mixing vessel" for the two viruses that could combine to create a new, more virulent strain.

 

'Likely cases' in New Zealand


Ten New Zealand teenage students who recently traveled to Mexico have tested positive for influenza and are "likely" to have contracted swine flu, Health Minister Tony Ryall said Sunday.

Ryall said in a statement that samples from the infected students had been sent to a WHO laboratory in the Australian city of Melbourne to determine whether they had contracted H1N1 swine influenza.

They already tested positive for influenza A, of which swine flu is a sub-set.

"Ministry of Health officials advise me there is no guarantee these students have swine influenza, but they consider it likely," the minister said.

Date created : 2009-04-26

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