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Schindler's list goes on show in Germany

Latest update : 2009-05-05

A copy of a list of Jewish forced labourers - 1,200 workers that Oskar Schindler managed to have transferred to a factory in Bruennlitz, thus saving their lives - is among rare documents that have gone on display in Germany.

AFP - A copy of a list of Jewish forced labourers saved by Oskar Schindler are among rare documents that went on display in Germany on Tuesday, the body responsible for preserving Nazi papers said.

Others include a document with names of people transported to death camps including Anne Frank and Gestapo records on Konrad Adenauer, West Germany's first postwar chancellor, the International Tracing Service (ITS) said.

The list is of the 1,200 workers that Schindler managed to have transferred to a factory in Bruennlitz -- Brnenec in the present day Czech Republic -- from another factory he owned near the Plaszow concentration camp.

The Nazis would otherwise have moved the workers, who included men, women and children, to other camps in the final stages of World War II where they would almost certainly have been exterminated.

The list is different to the one typed by Schindler's Jewish accountant Itzhak Stern as depicted in Steven Spielberg's 1993 film "Schindler's List", however, said ITS spokeswoman Kathrin Flor.

"Instead it is a list made after the prisoners' arrival in Bruennlitz typed by Mietek Pemper," the Jewish secretary of Amon Goeth, Plaszow commandant, Flor told AFP. "In principle though they are the same names."

The ITS, based in Bad Arolsen in central Germany, also said it would be conserving this year around 400,000 original documents that have become damaged over the years.

More than 30 million documents on the fate of approximately 17.5 million victims of the Nazi regime are stored in the ITS archives, around 75 percent of which are originals from the Nazi era and the immediate postwar period.

In 2001 the ITS conducted a damage analysis, revealing an urgent need for action in the case of 4.3 million documents from concentration camps, ghettos and Gestapo prisons.

Among the original documents to be preserved this year are individual files from the Buchenwald concentration camp such as prisoners’ registration cards and personal property cards.

Others include lists from the concentration camps Neuengamme, Natzweiler and Mauthausen, and Gestapo cards from the German cities of Koblenz and Frankfurt.

The documents had been used as working papers for many decades. With their help, ITS clarified the fate of many of those persecuted by the Nazis. The entire inventory of the archive is currently being digitised.

 

Date created : 2009-05-05

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