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France's Plan to Tackle Racism

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Marine Le Pen and Thomas Piketty in Time magazine's power list; EU takes on Google; Gunter Grass dies (part 2)

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Deadly Crossing: Migrants desperate to reach Europe; Abadi in Washington (part 1)

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EYE ON AFRICA

Xenophobic attacks in South Africa: anti-violence marches and anti immigration protest

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FRANCE IN FOCUS

French PM outlines action plan against racism, anti-Semitism

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REPORTERS

Turkey’s hidden Armenians search for stolen identity

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REVISITED

Families of slain Marikana miners still demanding justice

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#TECH 24

Europe vs. Google: EU accuses search giant of market dominance abuse

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#THE 51%

Women in America: Land of the free, home to the less-paid

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SCIENCE

This week: clouds are accumulating over the sun's energy

Text by Eve IRVINE

Latest update : 2009-06-22

Every 40 minutes enough sunlight falls on earth to potentially provide humanity with a years worth of energy. In this show we'll be looking at the value of the sun.

The sun is a great natural resource and it could provide electricity to the entire planet but for that to happen, more technical advances will have to be made.

 

Scientists are working on new solar panels, that will be more powerful, easier to use, and cheaper than what is currently available. For the moment, silicon chips are the basis of most solar panels. They are effective but pricey

 

As the economic crisis hits hard businesses are investing less in renewable energy. Indeed, the International Energy Agency estimates that we'll see a 38 percent drop this year.

 

Solar subsidies are also falling across Europe as governments tighten their belts. The cloud hangs heaviest in Spain. The photovoltaic sector which was booming, has hit hard times. Organisations such as Greenpeace are upset with what they see as mismanagement of the energy market.

 

Finally, fame often comes with a price: Egypt's white desert is becoming more and more popular with tourists, but the attention is taking some of the shine off the impressive sloping sands there, and now some holidaymakers find themselves getting out their rubber gloves and cleaning up.

 

Date created : 2009-05-30

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