Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

DEBATE

Child Migrants In America: What to do about the wave of unaccompanied minors? (Part Two)

Read more

DEBATE

Child Migrants In America: What to do about the wave of unaccompanied minors?

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Abbas Araghchi, Iranian deputy foreign minister

Read more

THE OBSERVERS

More of this year's best Observers stories

Read more

FOCUS

When water becomes a weapon of war

Read more

ENCORE!

Eve Ensler: 'In The Body Of The World'

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Ed Husain, Author of 'The Islamist'

Read more

DEBATE

Pakistan Protests: Democracy put to the test

Read more

DEBATE

Pakistan Protests: Democracy put to the test (part 2)

Read more

  • IS video purports to show beheading of second US journalist

    Read more

  • Could France sell the Mona Lisa to pay off its debts?

    Read more

  • Video: Bodies ‘left behind’ as Ukraine forces flee rebel assault

    Read more

  • Trust and 'bio-disaster units' needed to fight Ebola

    Read more

  • France vows crackdown on unemployment benefit ‘abusers’

    Read more

  • Julie Gayet wins privacy case against French glossy Closer

    Read more

  • Germany blocks popular car pick-up service Uber

    Read more

  • Several UN peacekeepers killed in Mali explosion

    Read more

  • NATO plans new 'spearhead' force to counter Russia

    Read more

  • French clubs left behind as others spend big

    Read more

  • Britain drops arrest warrant for ill boy’s parents

    Read more

  • When water becomes a weapon of war

    Read more

  • Arab media strike back at IS Islamists – with cartoons

    Read more

  • US military targets Somalia's al Shabaab Islamist group

    Read more

  • Eve Ensler: 'In The Body Of The World'

    Read more

  • Boko Haram Islamists seize northeast Nigerian town

    Read more

  • Is Carla Bruni against a political comeback for Sarkozy?

    Read more

  • Monaco’s Falcao leaves Ligue 1 for Man Utd

    Read more

Africa

President Omar Bongo 'dies', unconfirmed reports say

Video by Catherine NICHOLSON , Cédric MOLLE LAURENCON

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-06-08

Gabon's President Omar Bongo has died after 41 years in power in the central African country, French media said on Sunday, but the country's prime minister said he was unable to confirm the reports.

REUTERS - Gabon's President Omar Bongo has died after 41 years in power in the central African country, French media said on Sunday, but the country's prime minister said he was unable to confirm the reports.

The 73-year-old checked into a clinic in Spain last month amid reports that he was suffering from cancer, fuelling speculation over the future of the former French colony, which has a well established oil industry.

There was no immediate comment from the hospital on Sunday.

Quoting a source close to Bongo's entourage, the website of French magazine Le Point reported on Sunday that Bongo had died.

But Gabon's Prime Minister Jean Eyeghe Ndong said he was surprised by the French media reports. "If such a situation happens, I think and I know that the family of President Bongo would naturally inform me. This is not the case at the moment I am talking to you," Ndong told Gabonese television on Sunday evening.

Concerns over the health of Africa's longest-serving ruler intensified last month after he suspended his functions as head of the oil-producing state for the first time since taking power in 1967.

But Gabon's government said last month Bongo was resting in Spain after the death of his wife in March and that he would return home to resume his functions as head of state.

Reports that Bongo was ill had fuelled debates over who would take over and speculation there might be turmoil, as in Togo when long-time President Gnassingbe Eyadema died in 2005.

But Eurasia Group Middle East and Africa analyst Sebastian Spio-Garbrah says the fears are unfounded and Bongo's son, Defence Minister Ali Ben Bongo, was likely to take over.

"Despite widespread foreign investor worries ... an orderly secession managed by the ruling Gabonese Democratic Party (PDG) will install Bongo's well-respected son ... or another close family member, to the presidency and avoid any messy succession crisis," he wrote in a research note last month.

In the event of the president's death, the constitution calls for Senate President Rose Francine Rogombe, a PDG ally, to step in as caretaker leader in charge of organising elections.

The prospect of turmoil in the case of the president's death has also been reduced by Bongo's long-term successes of minimising ethnic tensions in the country, analysts say.

Bongo nurtured close ties with former colonial power France, whose Total SA oil giant is one of the biggest investors in the country.
 

Date created : 2009-06-07

COMMENT(S)