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Windows 7 systems stripped of IE in Europe

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-06-12

US software giant Microsoft will not bundle its Internet Explorer Web browser with its latest operating system Windows 7 in Europe due to EU competition law and a pending legal proceeding.

AFP - Microsoft on Thursday said regulatory wrangling has prompted it to strip Internet Explorer Web browsers from copies of its Windows 7 operating system to be sold in Europe.

The US software giant said it still plans to release its next-generation operating system worldwide on October 22, but that customers in Europe will have to install Web browsers of their choice.

"We're committed to making Windows 7 available in Europe at the same time that it launches in the rest of the world, but we also must comply with European competition law as we launch the product," Microsoft deputy general counsel Dave Heiner said in a written release.

"Given the pending legal proceeding, we've decided that instead of including Internet Explorer in Windows 7 in Europe, we will offer it separately and on an easy-to-install basis to both computer manufacturers and users."

Microsoft announced the development this week so computer makers can adapt to having to install Web browsers in new machines running on the US software giant's new operating system, according to Heiner.

"We're committed to launching Windows 7 on time in Europe, so we need to address the legal realities in Europe, including the risk of large fines," Heiner said.

"We believe that this new approach, while not our first choice, is the best path forward given the ongoing legal case in Europe."

Microsoft is defending itself in the European Union against accusations of unfairly crushing rivals in the Web browser market.

The commission, Europe's top competition watchdog, opened a new front in its epic antitrust battle with Microsoft in January, hitting the company with fresh charges of unfairly squashing competition.

Microsoft is to defend itself at a hearing, which companies are allowed to do under EU antitrust rules.

If Microsoft fails to beat back the charges, the commission could slap the company with huge new fines and order it to change its ways.

The commission accuses Microsoft of crushing rivals by bundling its Internet Explorer web browser into its ubiquitous Windows personal computer operating system, giving the program a huge advantage over competitors' browsers.

Heiner said Microsoft expects that stripping IE from Windows 7 will bolster its position that it is not bundling software in order to suffocate competition.

"We will continue to discuss browser issues and other matters with the Commission," Heiner said.

"We know we need to have a clear plan in place to address the 'bundling' issue in Europe because, at the end of the day, the obligation to comply with European competition law belongs to Microsoft alone."
 

Date created : 2009-06-11

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