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IN THE PAPERS

Shifts in the propaganda war waged between Israelis and Palestinians

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IN THE PAPERS

French MPs face quandary in pro-Palestinian rallies

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THE INTERVIEW

Yezid Sayigh, Senior Associate at the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut

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#TECH 24

Mind the Gender Gap : getting more women into the tech sector

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INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Bolivian children: heading to work aged 10

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WEB NEWS

Israel and Hamas battle online over public opinion

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FOCUS

Can Chancellor Merkel's winning streak last?

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FOCUS

Hunger in a fertile land...

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DEBATE

Nigeria: One Hundred Days and Counting (part 2)

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  • Live: Air Algérie flight missing over northern Mali

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  • ‘Many’ French passengers on board missing Algerian plane

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  • Iraqi parliament elects moderate Kurd as president

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  • Sudanese Christian woman sentenced to death arrives in Italy

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  • No end to fighting until Israel ends Gaza blockade, Hamas says

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  • Two foreign women shot dead in western Afghanistan

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  • At least 60 killed in attack on prison convoy near Baghdad

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  • Cycling is ‘winning the war on doping,’ says expert

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  • Ceasefire agreed for Central African Republic

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  • Can Jew-kissing-Arab selfie give peace a viral chance?

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  • In pictures: Thousands march for Gaza peace in Paris

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  • France charges Swiss bank UBS with tax fraud

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  • Israel faces heightened diplomatic pressure as Gaza violence rages

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  • Botched Arizona execution takes nearly two hours

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  • Bomb attacks leave scores dead in north Nigeria

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SCIENCE

This week : Burying nuclear waste…forever

Text by Eve IRVINE

Latest update : 2009-06-29

After years of research Sweden is poised to create the world’s first ever permanent storage site for nuclear waste.

At Oskharsham in the south of the country a 4km long site has developed a way of burying the toxic waste. Once buried it is laid to rest for 100,000 years, after which time the radiation in it is deemed to be equal to that naturally found in uranium. The final site will be situation to the north of Stockholm. In fact two towns spent months fighting to have the nuclear waste site based in their countryside.

 

Earlier this year Sweden overturned a 30 -year ban on nuclear power. It did so to further secure its energy supply and also because nuclear power does not emit C02 it is thus considered an option in the fight against global warming. Sweden remains one of the world leaders in terms of renewable energy and has set itself the ambitious target of having 50% of its energy needs satisfied by such means by 2020. That is double the target set in other European states.

 

In Stockholm, all of the cities buses are run on ethanol. The city switched over to this in 1990, in a bid to reduce pollution. At first, just 30 ethanol-fueled buses were added to the fleet for a three-year test period. This proved positive and 20 years later Sweden has continued to be innovative with energy in its transport. Central Station sees hundreds of people pass through its corridors every day and the body heat they generate is now being used to heat the office block next door.

 

Finally ENVIRONMENT spends the evening at a climate party, inspired by the Tupperware style party’s of years gone by this one tries to sell people ways in which the can help save the planet. Organizers feel that the personal approach is much more effective and that people will be more inclined to act if a friend or colleague rather than a politician or the media are giving them the message.

 

Date created : 2009-06-29

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