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France

Fillon says 'no other solution' than to raise the retirement age

Text by FRANCE 24 (with wires)

Latest update : 2009-06-28

French Prime Minister François Fillon said Saturday that the only way the government can make its retirement payments is to raise the retirement age from today's 60 years. Fillon has made lowering France's deficit a priority of his administration.

French Prime Minister François Fillon on Saturday said that the only way the government can make its retirement payments is to raise the legal retirement age.

 

"There is no other solution for saving the retirement system than working for a longer period," he said.

 

Fillon has made lowering France's deficit a priority of his administration. The father of a 2003 retirement law, Fillon said on June 15 that considering raising the retirement age was "not taboo" despite the strong opposition to it that exists among members of the public and the workers' unions. The legal age of retirement is currently set at 60.

 

President Nicolas Sarkozy said in a June 22 address to Congress that the government was taking its fiscal responsibilities very seriously and would consider "all the options", including possibly raising the retirement age.

 

Date created : 2009-06-27

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