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SCIENCE

This week : waters too hot for fish to handle in Turkey

Text by Eve IRVINE

Latest update : 2009-07-07

This week ENVIRONMENT casts its eyes across the worlds troubled waters as France draws to a close a nationwide debate about the sea and what should be done to protect them.

 

 This edition looks at waters that are too hot to handle in Turkey-global warming means that waters there are warming up, as a result certain fish such as sardines are swimming away towards cooler pools in Russia.
 

Last October, the Bosporus recorded temperatures of 21 degrees Celsius, where 17 is the norm.  What’s more, the fish that are still present have become a lot thinner as they don’t need as much fat to stay warm.

 

France is the world's biggest pleasure boat manufacturer but its coasts are becoming overcrowded with marinas that are eating into nature areas. On France's Atlantic coast a docking bay for pleasure boats is causing uproar.

 

A marina with space for a thousand pleasure boats is proposed for a site that would cover protected wetlands and agricultural areas. Today the project is on stand by as the region's main city has vetoed it but there is a logistical need for more docking stations.

 

Fishing, tourism but also industry's can have a detrimental effect on the world's waters. In New Caledonia disaster struck on the first of April this year when thousands of litres of sulphuric acid leaked into a stream flowing to the sea. Three thousand fish were killed, three species became extinct.

 

Date created : 2009-07-07

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