Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

AFRICA NEWS

2014-07-11 21:47 AFRICA NEWS

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Finally, a good use for new app "Yo"

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 11 July 2014 (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 11 July 2014

Read more

REPORTERS

Exclusive: an unlikely victim of the 'War on Terror'

Read more

#THE 51%

Sweden: A Feminist's Paradise?

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Politics: parties under pressure

Read more

FOCUS

In Burma, the rise of radical Buddhism

Read more

ENCORE!

Haute Couture: the hand-stitched clothing made in Paris that sells for the price of small yachts

Read more

  • Netanyahu resists international pressure to stop air strikes on Gaza

    Read more

  • Ukraine promises retaliation after rebel assault

    Read more

  • Amazon snubs French free delivery ban with one-cent charge

    Read more

  • Exclusive: an unlikely victim of the 'War on Terror'

    Read more

  • Magnitude 6.8 quake, small tsunami hit east Japan

    Read more

  • The third-place playoff: the World Cup game no one wants to play

    Read more

  • Suspect in Brussels Jewish Museum shooting drops extradition appeal

    Read more

  • Kurdish forces take over two oilfields in northern Iraq

    Read more

  • Are French high school students getting smarter?

    Read more

  • Italy’s Trentin wins seventh stage of Tour de France

    Read more

  • Disgraced Suarez leaves Liverpool for Barcelona

    Read more

  • In pictures: Chanel, Dior and so much more at the Paris couture shows

    Read more

  • French ‘Civic Service’ eyes massive expansion amid huge demand

    Read more

  • In Pictures: Petrol station hit by Hamas rockets

    Read more

  • Manhunt as FIFA partner flees Rio hotel to avoid arrest

    Read more

Africa

Construction workers agree to end strike

©

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-07-15

South African builders have agreed to end a week-long strike that has disrupted work on stadiums for the 2010 World Cup, the main union involved reported. The strike has raised concerns about whether South Africa will be ready for the tournament.

REUTERS - South African construction workers have agreed to end a week-long strike that has disrupted work on stadiums for the 2010 World Cup, the main union involved in the dispute said on Wednesday.


The National Union of Mineworkers, which includes building workers, said details of a wage agreement would be unveiled when the deal is signed at midday on Wednesday.


“We have an agreement ... The strike will be called off immediately after the signing and the workers will be expected to report for work on Thursday,” Thamsanqa Matosa, deputy president of the National Union of Mineworkers, told Reuters.


Workers have been striking for a week, paralysing work on 2010 World Cup soccer stadiums and on the mass transit Gautrain high-speed rail project, serving the area around Johannesburg.


The strike has raised concerns about whether South Africa will be ready for the tournament and hit shares in construction companies such as Murray & Roberts, WBHO and Group Five.


It also comes as unions threaten strikes in a clutch of important sectors, including gold, raising pressure on new President Jacob Zuma, who took office in May and is battling the first recession in 17 years.


The NUM earlier said workers and employers had agreed on a 12 percent wage increase but were still arguing over efforts by companies to ban any further strikes until after the showcase tournament. The union initially demanded 13 percent.


Matosa declined to comment on what level of wage increase had been agreed and on whether the workers would be blocked from further industrial action until after next year’s event.


“Those details will be revealed after the signing,” he said.


The unions helped propel Zuma to power and have been emboldened by him taking office, demanding big wage increases and threatening strikes across several sectors in recent weeks.


But Zuma has little room for manoeuvre given the lacklustre economy. Companies, too, are battling a slump in demand and are under pressure from shareholders to curtail costs.


Unions announced strikes in the paper, energy and chemical industries on Tuesday and said action in the important gold sector was “highly likely”.
 

Date created : 2009-07-15

Comments

COMMENT(S)