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Business

French PM summons bank leaders over bonuses row

Video by FRANCE 2 , Rachel MARUSAK

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-08-07

French Prime Minister François Fillon has summoned bank leaders on Friday over banking giant BNP Paribas' contentious plan to pay out one billion euros in bonuses. BNP received a 5.1-billion-euro bailout loan in taxpayers' money last year.

AFP - A political row erupted on Thursday in France as banks began to hand out huge staff bonuses, just months after their state bail-out and while job losses mounted in the struggling real economy.
   
On the international stage, President Nicolas Sarkozy has led calls for tighter regulation of bankers' bonuses, and has promised to control them at home, amid mounting public anger at the financial sector.
   
Nevertheless, on Wednesday banking giant BNP Paribas, which last year was loaned 5.1 billion euros (7.3 billion dollars) to see it through the global credit crunch, announced plans to pay employees one billion euros in bonuses.
   
Prime Minister Francois Fillon has summoned bank leaders to a meeting at his office on Friday to remind them of their engagements under the bail-out plan and ordered the central bank to ensure their "strict respect of bonus rules."
   
BNP Paribas insists it will abide by guidelines agreed by the G20 group of countries to reform the bonus culture, which is blamed by some for the cavalier risks taken by greedy traders that set the stage for the eventual crunch.
   
But, coming amid a recession and at a time when the collapse of numerous manufacturing businesses is driving up unemployment, the sheer scale of the pay-outs is likely to pose a political problem for Sarkozy's government.
   
Meanwhile, other French banks appear set to celebrate their own return to profit with yet more avalanches of cash for employees.
   
Leading Socialist lawmaker Jean-Marc Ayrault described BNP's bonus package as "profoundly scandalous," in an interview with Europe 1 radio.
   
"I demand the government force BNP to halt payment of these bonuses right away. If we return to the same habits we'll run into the same errors, the same problems," said Ayrault.
   
French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde, who next month will travel with Sarkozy to the G20 summit in Pittsburgh in order to promote tighter financial regulation, called on the central bank to review BNP's plan.
   
"Several banks are preparing decisions on the issue of remunerating their employees," she said, calling on the Banque de France "to exercise extreme vigilance and ensure the effective imposition of defined rules.
   
"France was the first marketplace to give itself rules on remuneration policies for these actors in order to halt payments not related to true performance nor responsible risk management," she insisted.
   
For its part, BNP Paribas said it was happy to open its books to the Banque de France's banking commission in order to demonstrate that the bonuses were justified and in line with the rules outlined by G20 leaders.
   
"We are one of the first banks in the world to have applied these rules retroactively after the decision at the start of 2009 about variable remuneration for 2008," a spokesman said.
   
BNP Paribas insists G20 leaders did not suppress bonus payments per se, but agreed to clamp down on guaranteed bonuses over multiple calendar or financial years, or their calculation on net earnings after write-downs on risk.
   
French bankers are worried that they could lose talented staff to US and British competitors if they are forced to cut back on performance-related bonuses more severely than their international rivals.
   
Britain is due to introduce its own code of conduct in the near future, but the United States has held out against calls for tighter regulation.
   
"BNP Paribas is not a bank that overpays its people," said BNP board member Jean-Pierre Gianno. "But if the pay gap with other banks becomes too great, the traders won't stay."
   
But with 17,000 employees in BNP's investment banking division to receive an average of 59,000 euros (85,000 dollars) each, and with French jobless figures up 25 percent on June 2008, this argument is unlikely to impress voters.

Date created : 2009-08-06

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