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The World This Week - August 29th, 2014

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French Prime Minister calls on ECB to go further to help economy

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South Africa: Four men guilty of shooting Rwandan exile

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France: fighting political corruption with transparency

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No strategy and a beige suit

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 29 August 2014 (part 2)

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Alain Choquette: A Hilarious Magician in Paris

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FOCUS

France welcomes Iraqi Christian refugees

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  • Iraqi forces free Armeli in biggest victory over IS militants since June

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  • Anti-government protesters storm Pakistan's state TV

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  • PSG trounce Saint-Etienne 5-0 with Ibrahimovic hat trick

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  • Putin calls for 'statehood' talks on eastern Ukraine

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  • Rescue efforts under way after French apartment block blast

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  • Poland marks 75 years since German invasion of WWII

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  • Israel appropriates large tracts of West Bank land

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  • Tension rises in Hong Kong as Beijing rejects open elections

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  • French police stop 'teenage jihadist' from flying to Syria

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  • Kidnapped Yazidi women 'sold to Islamists' in Syria

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  • Confusion reigns after Lesotho 'coup'

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  • France's Simon beats Ferrer to advance to last 16 in US Open

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  • French PM vows to safeguard 35-hour work week

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  • Inside Novoazovsk – the pro-Russians' latest conquest

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  • Filipino UN troops escape Islamists in Golan Heights

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  • Fugitive British killer returns to French psychiatric hospital

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SCIENCE

This week: Back to the future

Text by Eve IRVINE

Latest update : 2009-08-10

Environment visits CERN, where physicists are trying to re-create the moments after the big bang in a bid to examine particles that existed then but have since disappeared- going back in time in order to understand what our universe is made up of.

At the moment of the big bang and for a fraction of a second after it there were the tiniest of particles present that have since disappeared. Smashing sub-atomic particles together will re-create what was then and bring scientists closer to our origins.
 
“The goal”, explains physicist Andreas Schopper,  “is to understand the origins of matter- One of the fundamental questions being asked now is whether or not the Higgs particle exists. Finding that particle will allow us to understand why particles have a mass and what the mass of each one is.”

The Higgs particle plays a leading role in current theory of how the world is made and finding it will validate these predictions, bringing us to a greater understanding of how the universe works.

It is perhaps the most well know bit of the experiment but scientists are looking for lots of other particles-indeed 96% of the world's particles remain unknown.

But of the 4% elements that are known one group of microscopic particles causing concern are the so called “fine particles,” found in the air. Experts say that in Europe  these are responsible for 300,000 premature deaths every year and France’s Junior Minister for the ecology warns that this form of pollution is more present inside our homes than outside them.

And while in France all sides are working to find a plan to tackle the problem and hopes to have one ready for September, coming to a consensus on a carbon tax could prove harder. Switzerland has had a carbon tax for some time now and the price is set to triple come January. ENVIRONMENT looks at how it’s working there where there is little objection from the payers of the tax.
 

Date created : 2009-08-10

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