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Middle east

Authorities receive body believed to be British hostage

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-09-02

Iraqi authorities have received a body that may be one of five Britons kidnapped in May 2007, British Foreign Secretary David Miliband (pictured) said on Wednesday. Miliband said, however, that the identity could not be "definitively" confirmed.

AFP - Iraqi authorities have received a body which they believe is one of the five British hostages kidnapped in May 2007, British Foreign Secretary David Miliband said Wednesday.
   
"We cannot yet definitively confirm either that this is the remains of one of the hostages, or which one," Miliband said, adding that British specialists in Baghdad would undertake forensic examinations to identify the body.
   
A group of 40 gunmen from a group called the League of the Righteous kidnapped the five Britons -- IT consultant Peter Moore and his four bodyguards -- from the finance ministry in Baghdad in May 2007.
   
The bodies of two of the bodyguards were handed over to Britain in June and Prime Minister Gordon Brown warned the following month that a further two of the five were "very likely" to be dead.
   
Miliband said British authorities believe Moore is still alive.
   
"My thoughts and those of all my colleagues in government are, of course, with the families of the British men kidnapped in Iraq," he said, adding he was determined "to keep this period of uncertainty for the families to a minimum."
 

Date created : 2009-09-02

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