Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola: Mali's first case dies

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Queen Elizabeth tweets

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The world this week - October 24 2014 (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The world this week - October 24 2014

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Art rocks and shocks Paris

Read more

#TECH 24

Samsung's Gear VR Reviewed

Read more

#TECH 24

How to become a Cyborg

Read more

ENCORE!

Paris rediscovers Picasso

Read more

#THE 51%

Should freezing your eggs be a company benefit?

Read more

Europe

Merkel 'deeply regrets' any civilian losses in German-led NATO strike

Video by Claire BONNICHON , Shona BHATTACHARYYA

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-09-07

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she would "deeply regret" the loss of any Afghan civilian lives in a NATO air strike on Friday that was ordered by a German commander. Kunduz province officials say six civilians were killed in the strike.

AFP - German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Sunday said she would "deeply regret" if any civilian lives were lost in a recent NATO air strike in Afghanistan, which was ordered by a German military commander.
   
"If there were civilian casualties, I would deeply regret that," said Merkel before meeting in Berlin with British Prime Minister Gordon Brown.
   
She called for a "quick, complete and open" inquiry by NATO into Friday's raid on northern Kunduz province.
   
Merkel reassured the around 4,000-strong German troops in increasingly violent northern Afghanistan, who she said were serving "in difficult conditions", that their country was "standing behind them".
   
The NATO-led force in Afghanistan denied Sunday that its investigators had already wrapped up their inquiry and had reached a definitive death toll.
   
Mohammad Omar, governor of Kunduz province, told AFP by telephone Sunday that six civilians, including a child, were among a total of 54 people killed in the air strike, which targeted two fuel tankers hijacked by the Taliban.
 

Date created : 2009-09-07

COMMENT(S)