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EU countries send envoys back to Honduras

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-09-26

European Union countries are to send back their envoys to Honduras in a bid to help resolve the ongoing crisis, with the Swedish EU presidency adding that the move in no way implied recognition of the country's de facto government.

AFP - European Union countries have decided to send back their envoys to Honduras to help resolve the crisis following the ousting of the country's president, the Swedish EU presidency said Saturday.
  
But it added that the move in no way implied recognition of the country's de facto government.
  
The ambassadors of France, Germany, Italy and Spain were withdrawn in protest after President Manuel Zelaya was expelled from the country by soldiers three months ago amid a dispute over his plans to change the constitution, and Roberto Micheletti took control.
  
Zelaya made a suprise return to Honduras on Monday and has since been holed up in the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa with some 60 other people as soldiers surround the building and his supporters demonstrate on the streets.
  
Sweden said the return of the ambassadors was an important step in helping to restore constitutional order and a diplomatic process in Honduras.
  
But the situation appeared deadlocked after the de facto rulers said they were not ready to meet with a delegation of central American diplomats hoping to help mediate the crisis.
  
"Honduran politics are not a threat to international peace and security, and, as a consequence, there should be a Honduran solution" to the stalemate, the foreign ministry said in a statement.
  

Date created : 2009-09-26

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