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Tehran will not discuss nuclear 'rights' at Geneva talks

Video by Catherine NICHOLSON

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2009-09-30

The Iranian delegation at Thursday's meeting in Geneva with six world powers will not discuss its nuclear "right", the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Association Ali Akbar Salehi (pictured) said.

REUTERS - Iran will not discuss any issues related to its nuclear "rights" at Thursday's meeting in Geneva with six world powers, its nuclear energy agency chief said.

Ali Akbar Salehi, head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation, made clear on Tuesday this included a newly disclosed uranium enrichment plant which has drawn Western condemnation.

His comments seemed certain to disappoint the United States which has called on Iran to come clean about its nuclear programme, which the West suspects is aimed at making bombs. Tehran insists it needs the technology to generate power.

"We are not going to discuss anything related to our nuclear rights, but we can discuss about disarmament, we can discuss about non-proliferation and other general issues," Salehi told a news conference.

"The new site is part of our rights and there is no need to discuss it," he said, adding Tehran would not abandon its nuclear activities "even for a second".

The United States and its Western allies have made clear they will focus on Iran's nuclear programme at the Geneva meeting. Iran has offered wide-ranging security talks.

Salehi was earlier quoted as saying that Iran would soon inform the U.N. nuclear watchdog of a timetable for inspection of the new plant, its second uranium enrichment facility.

Last week's news of the facility, under construction south of Tehran, added urgency to this week's rare meeting in Switzerland. Iran's missile tests on Sunday and Monday have further fuelled tension with Western powers.

"Heart of the mountain"

A White House spokesman on Monday urged "immediate unfettered access" to the new site.

Iran has rejected Western condemnation of the new facility, saying it is legal and open to inspection by the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

"The doors of the site are open for inspections but for doing those inspections of the IAEA there are some protocols and in the framework of those protocols we will act," Salehi said.

"And when the time comes the inspections will take place ... it is not very far away," he added.

Salehi said the new enrichment plant was located "in the heart" of a mountain, in an area which the elite Revolutionary Guards had wanted to use as an ammunition depot.

"The site, we can call it a small Natanz site, is a way to show that Iran ... not even for a second will stop its nuclear activities," Salehi said, referring to its existing underground plant near the central city of Natanz.

He described the new facility as a "contingency plant" in case the Natanz site was threatened by military action.

"Compared to the Natanz facility, this place is relatively small, it is not an industrial site like Natanz," Salehi said.
 

Date created : 2009-09-29

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