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Honduran media join the fray

Video by Laurence CUVILLIER , Blake SCHMIDT

Text by Laurence CUVILLIER

Latest update : 2009-10-07

As diplomats from across the Americas step up efforts to resolve the standoff between interim leader Roberto Micheletti and ousted President Manuel Zelaya, Honduran media have made it clear who they are rooting for.

Roberto Micheletti, “the putschist president”? The “constitutional president”? The “de facto president”? Manuel Zelaya, “the ousted president”? The “elected president”? Or simply “Señor Zelaya”? Depending on the words chosen, viewers can quickly guess which candidate Honduran media have sided with.

 

As the struggle for power heats up in Honduras, local media have been dragged into the escalating polarisation. Today it is virtually impossible to find a broadcaster that uses neutral words to talk about the two main protagonists of the political crisis, Roberto Micheletti and Manuel Zelaya.
 
Hooking on to pro-Zelaya media, however, has proved tricky, since the Micheletti government has shut down the two main networks supporting his rival, Canal 36 and Radio Globo.

 
 

Date created : 2009-10-07

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