Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

Macron and Kagame meet to repair strained ties over Rwandan genocide

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Remembering Philip Roth

Read more

ENCORE!

Film show: 'Solo: A Star Wars Story', 'Angel Face' and 'Peeping Tom'

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Iraq: Children of Fallujah try to rebuild their lives

Read more

FOCUS

Philippines moves towards allowing divorce

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

'We are seeking a new deal', Pompeo advisor says on Iran

Read more

ENCORE!

Hugh Coltman serves up a New Orleans-inspired musical gumbo

Read more

ENCORE!

Music show: Opera singer Lawrence Brownlee, Snow Patrol & Natalie Prass

Read more

PERSPECTIVE

Are there other universes like ours?

Read more

Culture

Clint Eastwood awarded one of France's top honours

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2009-11-14

American actor and director Clint Eastwood can now add Commander of the French Legion of Honour to his list of achievements, after receiving one of France's highest honours from President Nicolas Sarkozy.

REUTERS -  President Nicolas Sarkozy awarded U.S. actor and director Clint Eastwood one of France's top honours on Friday, hailing him as a cinema legend and a symbol of the type of America that the French adored.

It is unusual for a foreigner to be elevated to the rank of commander of the French Legion of Honour but Eastwood, who went from playing tough guy roles like Dirty Harry to directing highly praised films, said he saw France as his second home.

"My wife chastised me saying if that was true why don't I speak French," he told friends and officials gathered at the Elysee Palace for the ceremony, promising to take lessons.

He jokingly referred to Sarkozy as "my president" after receiving the red-ribboned medal, and said he planned to go out and show off his award.

"As a commander of the arts and letters, I think I will go out on the streets of France today and throw my weight around," said Eastwood, 79, who recently finished making a supernatural thriller in France, "Hereafter".

Sarkozy said French admiration for U.S. cinema helped transcend any problems the two countries might have had in the past -- a veiled reference to France's fierce opposition to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003.

"When one loves the cinema of a people, one loves the people," the president said.

He called Eastwood, whose line "Come on, make my day" from Dirty Harry became a global catchphrase, "a myth, a giant, an example of the admiration we have for American culture".

He added that problems between the two countries had only arisen "when America was not as big as we would have liked in our dreams.

"You, you have never let us down," he added.

Date created : 2009-11-13

COMMENT(S)