Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

IN THE PAPERS

Germany's World Cup title

Read more

FASHION

Paris, Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2014-2015

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Farnborough air show takes off but F-35 jet is grounded

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Bastille Day celebrations

Read more

TOUR DE TECH

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola death toll increases in Sierra Leone

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Finally, a good use for new app "Yo"

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Viviane Reding, MEP, European People's Party

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Schulz returns to Parliament presidency: back to business as usual?

Read more

  • Live: France celebrates Bastille Day

    Read more

  • In pictures: 2014 World Cup historic moments

    Read more

  • Boules and booze: Bastille Day à la New Yorkaise

    Read more

  • Kremlin mulls 'retaliatory strikes' after death of Russian civilian

    Read more

  • Senegal honours the soldiers who fought for France in WWI

    Read more

  • Clashes erupt in Paris as thousands march to support Palestinians

    Read more

  • Operations underway to refloat shipwrecked Costa Concordia

    Read more

  • Germany defeat Argentina 1-0 to win fourth World Cup title

    Read more

  • Paris’s Bastille Day fireworks ‘a homage to victims’ of WWI

    Read more

  • Thousands flee northern Gaza after Israeli warning

    Read more

  • Major differences remain as deadline looms in Iran nuclear talks

    Read more

  • Rival Libyan militias exchange heavy fire at Tripoli airport

    Read more

  • French military to extend Mali 'counterterrorism' operations into Sahel

    Read more

  • Legendary conductor Lorin Maazel dies aged 84

    Read more

Europe

Second report into child abuse by Irish priests due

©

Video by By France 24

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2009-11-26

A second devastating report into child abuse in Roman Catholic institutions is set to be released, six months after a first report which shocked the Irish public.

AFP - Ireland's Roman Catholic Church braced for strong criticism in a new report Thursday on how it dealt with child sex abuse claims against priests in Dublin, the country's largest archdiocese.
   
Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin has warned the findings of judge Yvonne Murphy would "shock us all".
   
They come just six months after a landmark report in May horrified mainly Catholic Ireland by revealing widespread sexual, physical and emotional abuse of children in Catholic-run institutions dating back to the 1930s.
   
Murphy's investigation is the first ever state probe of how the once powerful church runs its affairs in Ireland.
   
For the last three years, she has been looking at how the Dublin archdiocese dealt with reports that there were child rapists among the clerics working in its parishes in the Irish capital.
   
It has been alleged that when a claim of sexual abuse was made, the police were not informed and the accused cleric was simply moved to another parish.
   
The Sunday Independent newspaper said the report had found successive archbishops covered up the abuse, driven by a "desire to preserve the power and aura of the Church and to avoid giving scandal to their congregations".
   
Archbishop Martin has been conducting his own investigations, and a year ago said that more than 150 Dublin clerics had been probed about allegations of child sex abuse in the last 68 years.
   
Some 400 people had been identified who have either complained or are known or suspected to have suffered abuse by priests in Dublin, he said, adding that "it is most likely that this is not a final figure".
   
He said eight Dublin priests had been convicted in the criminal courts and three others were facing charges, while 120 civil actions have been brought against 35 Dublin priests.
   
"Settlement of claims is running at over 10.5 million euros (15.8 million dollars)," Martin said at the time.
   
Justice Minister Dermot Ahern received the Murphy report in July but the findings have twice been before the High Court amid concerns that some of the revelations might prejudice ongoing criminal trials.
   
Prime Minister Brian Cowen's government considered the findings at a meeting on Tuesday and cleared them for publication.
   
Victims' groups were also briefed before they were made public, and the state's Health Executive Authority said counselling helplines had been set up to deal with the response.
   
The horrifying revelations in May's Ryan report about Catholic-run so-called industrial and reformatory schools, orphanages and other childcare institutions triggered a flood of calls from distressed victims.
   
A government redress scheme has already paid out about one billion euros (1.5 billion dollars) in compensation and legal fees to over 13,000 people who suffered abuse while in residential institutions.

 

Date created : 2009-11-26

Comments

COMMENT(S)