Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola virus: US to send 3,000 troops to West Africa

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

Inger Andersen, Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa, The World Bank

Read more

FOCUS

Scottish referendum: Should I stay or should I go?

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Paris conference: A coalition against the Islamic State group

Read more

ENCORE!

Encore's Film Show: Spies, doppelgangers and gay rights activists

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Salmond's 'emotional eve-of poll plea to Scots to seize their historic opportunity'

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Nick Witney, Senior Policy Fellow, European Council on Foreign Relations

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'Valls is starting to act like Hollande'

Read more

WEB NEWS

Wikileaks releases 'weaponized malware' customer list

Read more

Africa

Stability is biggest concern for ordinary Guineans

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2010-06-25

Guineans are worried. Their country has no leader and the army has stepped up arrests in its search for the would-be assassin who tried to kill junta leader Moussa Dadis Camara on Dec. 3.

With Guinean junta leader Dadis Camara still in hospital recovering from last week's assassination attempt, the stability of the rudderless country is the biggest anxiety of the country's citizens.

"We want him back in good health," says one Conakry resident. "What we don't want is the assassination of our head of state. After the death of general Lansana Conté, we can't go back, we want to move forward."

Camara, head of a junta that took control of Guinea Conakry a year ago following the death of President Conté, was shot on December 3 by his former aide, Lieutenant Aboubacar "Toumba" Diakité, who is now thought to be on the run.

Camara was taken to Rabat in Morocco where he underwent surgery and remains for the time being. No date has been given for his return to the country.

Since last week, the number of arrests in Guinea has soared as security forces search for Lieutenant Diakité and those who helped him.

Once again, it is ordinary innocent Guineans who fear being caught in the crossfire of a countrywide military crackdown.

"My wish is for a civilian president," says one student, who like many is hoping for a presidential election. "The military solution isn't working."

Date created : 2009-12-09

  • GUINEA

    Junta suspends crisis talks after accusing Paris of fomenting coup

    Read more

  • GUINEA

    Wounded junta leader Camara unable to communicate, says official

    Read more

COMMENT(S)