Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

FACE-OFF

Social unrest in France: A crucial test for the ruling Socialists

Read more

ACCESS ASIA

Philippines: Embedded with Islamic guerrillas

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'The name's Bond, Jane Bond'

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

French people blame government for current social unrest

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Landmark debt relief deal agreed for Greece

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

25 years of independence in Eritrea: Thousands continue to flee repressive regime

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Petrol shortages in France and free hugs in Britain

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Petrol shortages in France and #HugABrit

Read more

THE DEBATE

Obama in Vietnam: Just how close can Washington and Hanoi become? (part 1)

Read more

Our Focus programme brings you exclusive reports from around the world. From Monday to Friday at 7.45 am Paris time.

FOCUS

FOCUS

Latest update : 2010-02-09

Spaniards face up to having to work for longer

Spain might have a 20% unemployment rate, but those who do have a job may have to face up to working for longer. The government wants to raise the country's official retirement age from 65 to 67, saying the move is needed to cope with Spain's rapidly ageing population. The change will be phased in gradually from 2013, but workers' unions have already vowed to fight it.

Madrid financial market has just lived its worst week since the 2008 financial crisis. Spain’s markets were hard hit by Greece-related doubts among investors: its deficit rose to 11.4 per cent of GDP last year, and its public debt, although low by eurozone standards, is rising. The unemployment rate is rocketing at 18,83%.


Zapatero’s governement struggles to soothe investors and limit the lack of confidence that has spread across southern Europe from the financial crisis in Greece, pushing new reforms to cut spanish deficit and improve competitiveness: an austerity plan, a new frame for the job market, and a new pension system.

But delaying legal retirement age from 65 to 67 is not the kind of plans expected by Spaniards themselves. Announced in a rushing intent to reassure investors and European leaders, the plan is rejected by 84% of Spaniards, according to a study published by the newspaper El Pais on Sunday 7th. Unions raised what they consider as a paradoxical situation: government wants people to work longer, they say, but young Spaniards have many difficulties to enter in the job market (youth unemployment in Spain hits 43%).

Two generations, two different realities: Adeline Percept and Clément Perrouault, reporting in Madrid.

By Adeline PERCEPT

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2016-05-24 Lebanon

Video: Christian NGO brings Syrian refugees to Italy

In Italy, the community of Sant'Egidio, a Christian NGO, is setting up humanitarian corridors to bring Syrian refugee families from Lebanon to Italy. At the beginning of May,...

Read more

2016-05-23 Tunisia

Tunisia steps up security measures to reassure tourists

In Tunisia, the tourist season is just beginning. Since last year's deadly terror attacks on the Bardo museum in Tunis and a hotel in Sousse, which targeted tourists, the sector...

Read more

2016-05-20 China

Beijing tightens control of foreign NGOs

The Chinese government recently passed a law to bring foreign NGOs under stricter control. The legislation, which will come into force in 2017, gives police wide-ranging powers...

Read more

2016-05-19 Philippines

Philippines: Moro Islamic Liberation Front dreams of 'caliphate' on Mindanao

The southern Philippines island of Mindanao is where the majority of the Muslim community lives in this predominantly Christian country. Various armed groups are fighting for the...

Read more

2016-05-18 Egypt

Video: Egyptian journalists feel targeted by regime

In Egypt, protests continue despite the regime's crackdown on dissent. After doctors and lawyers voiced their anger, now it's the turn of Egypt's journalists. The crisis erupted...

Read more