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New Michelin ratings award French cuisine, both old and new

Text by FRANCE 24 (with wires)

Latest update : 2010-03-01

The latest edition of France's prestigious Michelin restaurant guide released on Monday has awarded three stars to a traditional eatery in south-western France and a first star to a 32-year-old chef in Paris.

The latest edition of France's prestigious Michelin restaurant guide released on Monday has awarded three stars to L'Auberge du Vieux Puits, a traditional eatery in Fontjoncouse, a remote village in south-western France near the Mediterranean coast.

There are now 26 three-star restaurants in France out of 558 restaurants awarded stars worldwide.

At L'Auberge du Vieux Puits, chef Gilles Goujon is known to serve up specialties of red mullet, baby goat, and eggs served with truffles over a mushroom and truffle purée. Set menus range from 58 to 125 euros.

Meanwhile, a 32-year-old chef in Paris, Adeline Grattard, was awarded her first star for Yam’Tcha, her small restaurant near the Louvre. Grattard is known to serve meticulously selected teas with Chinese-influenced specialties such as suckling pig with aubergines or dishes of mushrooms and chestnuts.

The star for Grattard is considered a surprise for the 101-year-old Michelin guide, which is sometimes accused of being too traditional.

In an interview with France24.com, director of Michelin guides, Jean-Luc Naret, said, “Paris remains the world capital of gastronomy, thanks to its many young and brilliant chefs” before adding: “Tokyo has more stars, but that’s because it has more restaurants”.

Date created : 2010-03-01

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