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Women and children the main victims of fatal religious clashes

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2010-03-08

Over 100 people were killed near the Nigerian city of Jos on Sunday, most of whom were reportedly women and children. The region has recently seen an escalation in sectarian violence.

AFP - At least 100 people were killed near the Nigerian city of Jos, the scene of recent sectarian violence which left hundreds dead, a government official and witnesses said Sunday.

"There has been an attack on Dogo Nahawa. Over a hundred people have been killed -- most of them women and children," a government official who spoke on condition of anonymity told AFP.

"Some of the children are less than one year old," he said.

A local journalist counted 103 corpses in the village, south of the capital Abuja, and 18 at a Jos city morgue.

Residents and local rights activists blamed the overnight attack on ethnic Fulani pastoralists.

Date created : 2010-03-07

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