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Google stops censoring its search engine in China

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2010-03-22

Google says visitors to its Chinese-language search engine are being redirected to its uncensored Hong Kong platform, effectively ending censorship on its Chinese website in defiance of warnings by the country's authorities.

AFP - Google announced Monday that it has stopped censoring its Chinese-language search engine Google.cn.
  
"Earlier today we stopped censoring our search services -- Google Search, Google News, and Google Images -- on Google.cn," Google chief legal officer David Drummond said in a blog post.
  
"Users visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese, specifically designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our servers in Hong Kong," he said.

However, the Internet giant said it plans to continue research and development work in China and maintain a sales presence there.
  
"In terms of Google's wider business operations, we intend to continue R&D work in China and also to maintain a sales presence there, though the size of the sales team will obviously be partially dependent on the ability of mainland Chinese users to access Google.com.hk," Google chief legal officer David Drummond said in a blog post.

Google's move came a little over two months after the Internet giant said it had been the victim of sophisticated cyberattacks originating from China.

 

Date created : 2010-03-22

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